March 26, 2014

cindykrikawa:

The Orchid Show : Key West Contemporary at The New York Botanical Garden, NYC.

Key West still lives in our Conservatory, at least through April 21. —MN

March 19, 2014

Just some photos from March 15’s Orchid Evening event in our Conservatory. As part of The Orchid Show: Key West Contemporary, it’s basically an excuse for us to break out a DJ, some mescal cocktails, and the twinkly overhead lights for a night under a canopy of tropical blooms. Like, thousands of them.

We went all out to bring the Florida Keys to New York this year (as a reminder that not all the world is an icy tundra), and if you’d like to join us, there are still a few Orchid Evenings in the works with the next one happening this Saturday, March 22. Register while you still can! We’ll be doing Pomegranate Sparklers as this week’s specialty drink, with more info over here. See you in the glasshouse. —MN

February 28, 2014

So, it turns out the polar vortex pretty much ceases to exist once you step into our Conservatory. That might be due to the fact that Key West is crashing there for a bit, though, and I don’t wanna brag, but, well, yes I do. With thousands of orchids splashing the place with tropical color, it’s like the southernmost point packed up its warmth, hoofed it north, and set up shop in NYC for a spell.

The Orchid Show: Key West Contemporary opens Saturday, March 1, running straight on through April 21. If you’re in the New York metro area, why miss out on an escape from this downright sadistic winter? And if you snag tickets to one of our Orchid Evenings (first one’s March 8!), you get the benefit of strolling through a confetti of orchids and a complimentary drink under our twinkly glasshouse lights. Though I suppose it would also be a complementary drink, since we all know Thing + Cocktail = Better Thing. —MN

February 23, 2014
dianemabrey:

My orchids are blooming! My favorite thing about February! Phalaenopsis orchids are one of the easiest plants to care for. Just give them some bright indirect light and water every couple of weeks.
They usually bloom around February or March. Fertilize them in the fall for maximum blooms.
They make great Valentine’s day gifts!

We’re a bit late for Valentine’s Day, but that doesn’t mean you can’t give the gift anyhow. Our orchids will be on display starting March 1st for The Orchid Show: Key West Contemporary! ~LM

dianemabrey:

My orchids are blooming! My favorite thing about February! Phalaenopsis orchids are one of the easiest plants to care for. Just give them some bright indirect light and water every couple of weeks.

They usually bloom around February or March. Fertilize them in the fall for maximum blooms.

They make great Valentine’s day gifts!

We’re a bit late for Valentine’s Day, but that doesn’t mean you can’t give the gift anyhow. Our orchids will be on display starting March 1st for The Orchid Show: Key West Contemporary! ~LM

January 16, 2014
menentk:

New York Botanical Garden - The orchid show by Erik Anestad on Flickr.

Guess what’s just around the corner! ~AR

menentk:

New York Botanical Garden - The orchid show by Erik Anestad on Flickr.

Guess what’s just around the corner! ~AR

December 19, 2013
spectacularuniverse:

Europe’s rarest orchid rediscovered in the Azores
This is exciting! One of my favorite angiosperms has been rediscovered on one of my favorite archipelagos. 
“The new species, known as Hochstetter’s butterfly-orchid, was first found in 1838 but had escaped official recognition for almost two centuries.
Researchers analysed the islands’ orchid populations and found the archipelago had three species of butterfly-orchid.”

Props for having both a favorite angiosperm and a favorite archipelago! Also, the rediscovery of a rare orchid is always exciting! ~AR

spectacularuniverse:

Europe’s rarest orchid rediscovered in the Azores

This is exciting! One of my favorite angiosperms has been rediscovered on one of my favorite archipelagos. 

The new species, known as Hochstetter’s butterfly-orchid, was first found in 1838 but had escaped official recognition for almost two centuries.

Researchers analysed the islands’ orchid populations and found the archipelago had three species of butterfly-orchid.”

Props for having both a favorite angiosperm and a favorite archipelago! Also, the rediscovery of a rare orchid is always exciting! ~AR

November 19, 2013

How do you save Australia’s most endangered orchid? First you have to protect it from the people who profess to love it the most. With only two plants suspected in the wild, and 50 seeds in storage, botanists are racing time and orchid lovers to protect this beautiful flower.  Via Scientific American. ~AR

October 25, 2013
An orchid sold for $100,000 in 1978. Now you can buy one for around $5 at your local hardware store. How did the orchid, once so rare, become oh so common? Taiwan’s orchid growers decide to start emulating the tech industry. No, really. ~AR
(via How the Precious Orchid Got So Cheap - WSJ.com)

An orchid sold for $100,000 in 1978. Now you can buy one for around $5 at your local hardware store. How did the orchid, once so rare, become oh so common? Taiwan’s orchid growers decide to start emulating the tech industry. No, really. ~AR

(via How the Precious Orchid Got So Cheap - WSJ.com)

October 6, 2013
laughingsquid:

Banksy Converts a New York City Delivery Truck Into a Beautiful Garden

Breaking street art-garden news! Looks like Banksy is a fan of orchids. But then again, who isn’t?

laughingsquid:

Banksy Converts a New York City Delivery Truck Into a Beautiful Garden

Breaking street art-garden news! Looks like Banksy is a fan of orchids. But then again, who isn’t?

September 3, 2013

ichthyologist:

The Complex Structure of Bucket Orchids

Orchids of the genus Coryanthes have evolved along with orchid bees, and depend on each other for reproduction.

Male bees are attracted to an pheromone laced wax produced under the orchid’s helmet. The wax is stored by the male and are used in courtship. However, the helmet is slippery and bees sometimes fall into the fluid filled bucket below.

Once in the bucket, their wings are wet, which prevent them from flying. The walls of the bucket are smooth and lined with downward pointing hairs, preventing the insect from escaping through climbing. A small opening towards the front of the flower is the only way out.

As the bee climbs through the narrow opening, they must press their bodies against sticky pollen packets. These are essentially glued to the bee’s body as it tries to escape. In order for fertilisation to happen, the pollen from one plant must be transferred to the stigma of another plant.

After the bee flies off and visits another flower, it goes through a similar ordeal. This time, as it exits the bucket, the pollen packet on its back brushes past the stigma of the new flower, thus achieving pollination.

dwittkower, dogtooth77, Alex Popovkin on Flickr

And orchids aren’t the only deceitful plants out there luring unsuspecting bugs to hassle and humiliation. Don’t forget the Amazon water lily, jack-in-the-pulpit, and the sapucaia tree. All have their methods, most of them tricky. —MN

June 14, 2013

anabargagli:

Orchid hunter, floral experimenter, wall typographer

A look into the novel orchid workshop of Yoichiro Uchida, in Fukuoka Japan. An interesting concept, and a beautiful mise en forme. One of my favorite blogs PingMag did a very nice article on him that you can read here. It’s worth a look! Also, you can find his workshop tumblr here. Enjoy!

That’s a familiar wall for obsessive orchid collectors (we have a bunch in the Nolen Greenhouses for Living Collections!). Sooner or later, you leave the pots behind and occupy an epiphytic space of…driftwood and tree bark. And you stand in front of it, thinking to yourself, “Life is preeeetty good.” —MN

May 17, 2013
fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Today’s photo is of a Vanilla plant model being constructed.
© The Field Museum, CSB36789, Photographer Charles Carpenter.
Milton Copulos, standing near a window, trimming Vanilla model. Stanley Field Plant Reproduction laboratory [Botany]. Field Columbian Museum
5x7 glass negative
1913

The vanilla pod is actually the fruit of the tropical orchid, Vanilla planifolia. It is the only orchid cultivated en masse for industrial purposes. ~AR

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Today’s photo is of a Vanilla plant model being constructed.

© The Field Museum, CSB36789, Photographer Charles Carpenter.

Milton Copulos, standing near a window, trimming Vanilla model. Stanley Field Plant Reproduction laboratory [Botany]. Field Columbian Museum

5x7 glass negative

1913

The vanilla pod is actually the fruit of the tropical orchid, Vanilla planifolia. It is the only orchid cultivated en masse for industrial purposes. ~AR

April 25, 2013

Jessica M. Clarke is the Garden’s Associate Curator of Glasshouse Collections. She’s also a woman that knows how to coordinate her nails with truly cool orchid species. She recently sent me these photos of an African miniature orchid on display in the orchid display case in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory’s Cloud Forest house. Aside from looking cool Bulbophyllum falcatum is “interesting because it’s rachis is very wide as compared to the size of its’ flowers … it appears as though the flowers are emerging from a paddle-shaped leaf.” And there’s your useless piece of trivia for the next boring cocktail party you find yourself at! ~AR

April 24, 2013
Lytro Light Field Photography at the 2013 Orchid Show

I received the Lytro camera yesterday at the William and Lynda Steere Herbarium. I am interested in using it for photographing plant specimens that require broad depth of field, but I could not resist giving it a test drive at the 2013 Orchid Show.

Click the image to change the focal point. Double click to zoom in and out.

Submitted by Michael Bevens, Information Manager for Digitization, Herbarium

Learn more about digital imaging and herbaria.

April 16, 2013
nicolekirstiesmith:

Beautiful and fragrant pansy orchids @nybg #orchidshow (at New York Botanical Garden)

nicolekirstiesmith:

Beautiful and fragrant pansy orchids @nybg #orchidshow (at New York Botanical Garden)

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