February 22, 2012
Warm Winter Leads to Early Blooms in Northeast
Notice anything particularly odd about your northeastern  garden this year? We have, as you’ll gather if you so much as glance at  any of the NYBG's social media feeds: there's regular talk of this  bizarrely warm winter and the early blooms it brings along. And if you  were to visit the NYBG right now for a look at flowering plants that in  years past would still be waiting for the alarm clock of spring, you'd  be surprised at what you found.
"We’re having earlier springs," says professor David Wolfe, part of  Cornell’s Department of Horticulture. In conjunction with Kristin  Schleiter, the NYBG’s acting Director of Outdoor Collections, NPR's  brief foray into this awkward season leaves us wondering if the warmth  will be a trending topic in coming years, or only a fluke visitor for  the 2011/2012 winter.
Either way, an early spring means early flowers, and that makes the Garden even more of a destination. Get here now!

Warm Winter Leads to Early Blooms in Northeast

Notice anything particularly odd about your northeastern garden this year? We have, as you’ll gather if you so much as glance at any of the NYBG's social media feeds: there's regular talk of this bizarrely warm winter and the early blooms it brings along. And if you were to visit the NYBG right now for a look at flowering plants that in years past would still be waiting for the alarm clock of spring, you'd be surprised at what you found.

"We’re having earlier springs," says professor David Wolfe, part of Cornell’s Department of Horticulture. In conjunction with Kristin Schleiter, the NYBG’s acting Director of Outdoor Collections, NPR's brief foray into this awkward season leaves us wondering if the warmth will be a trending topic in coming years, or only a fluke visitor for the 2011/2012 winter.

Either way, an early spring means early flowers, and that makes the Garden even more of a destination. Get here now!

March 22, 2011
Mud Season

Mud season—that crazy time of year here in the Northeast when gardeners must sit on their hands and not rush into planting things outdoors lest they compact the soil or freeze a batch of seedling—is upon us. The great guys over at Hudson Valley Seed Library have a wonderful poem that just might help you pass the days until it’s finally safe to place that first pea into the ground.

I will tuck in my cuffs and pull on high boots and kneel carefully
To preserve my muddy adorations of March.
I will build an altar to the mud.

Read the rest here.

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