January 25, 2014
A deadly Russula | Cornell Mushroom Blog

This is a point our trained mycologists make to me all the time: Even mushroom experts aren’t always sure about mushroom identification. This great blog post from the mycology department at Cornell highlights why it can be so dangerous to pursue mushroom hunting as an amateur hobby. But, it can also be fun and delicious. Just go into it with as much knowledge as you can, take a class if you can. And if you’re really not sure about whether or not a mushroom is okay to eat, err on the side of caution. You’re worth it! ~AR

(Source: plansfornigel)

December 11, 2013
mycology:

Help mycology by transcribing data:
"The Macrofungi Collection Consortium, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a partnership of 35 institutions across the U.S that collectively will digitize about 1.5 million specimens that have been collected the past 150 years."
"We have thousands of specimen images, labels and ledgers from museum collections and the biologists who maintain those collections. These contain information about the where and when a species was found in the past. We need you to help us transcribe that data and make it available for further use in biodiversity and conservation research. Along the way, you will be possibly be finding species that have never been observed anywhere else!"
http://www.notesfromnature.org/#/archives/macrofungi

Crowdsourcing, mushroom nerd, amateur mycologist fun alert! Help us help the world of macrofungi by transcribing herbaria labels from the past and around the world!

mycology:

Help mycology by transcribing data:

"The Macrofungi Collection Consortium, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a partnership of 35 institutions across the U.S that collectively will digitize about 1.5 million specimens that have been collected the past 150 years."

"We have thousands of specimen images, labels and ledgers from museum collections and the biologists who maintain those collections. These contain information about the where and when a species was found in the past. We need you to help us transcribe that data and make it available for further use in biodiversity and conservation research. Along the way, you will be possibly be finding species that have never been observed anywhere else!"

http://www.notesfromnature.org/#/archives/macrofungi

Crowdsourcing, mushroom nerd, amateur mycologist fun alert! Help us help the world of macrofungi by transcribing herbaria labels from the past and around the world!

December 1, 2013
mothernaturenetwork:

How mushrooms ‘make wind’ to spread sporesMushrooms live in tight quarters on forest floors, often isolated from strong air flows that may easily spread their spores.

This is a very different kind of “making wind” than what your grandfather might joke about at the dinner table. I think we can all be a little thankful for that! But seriously, this is a very interesting development in understanding mushroom reproduction, and if you are an amateur mycologist, it is well worth the five minutes it will take you to read. ~AR

mothernaturenetwork:

How mushrooms ‘make wind’ to spread spores
Mushrooms live in tight quarters on forest floors, often isolated from strong air flows that may easily spread their spores.

This is a very different kind of “making wind” than what your grandfather might joke about at the dinner table. I think we can all be a little thankful for that! But seriously, this is a very interesting development in understanding mushroom reproduction, and if you are an amateur mycologist, it is well worth the five minutes it will take you to read. ~AR

October 27, 2013

skyline-sunset-in-my-veins:

So my Botany Professor told us a Fungus joke in class today:

A Mushroom walks into a bar and the bartender says “We don’t serve your kind here.”

So the Mushroom asks “Why? I’m a fungi” 

Yes! I really miss professor humor. ~AR

October 21, 2013
artruby:

Carsten Höller. 

Carsten Höller holds a doctorate in agricultural science and other fun facts I learned about this contemporary artist with an obsession for fly-agaric mushrooms by reading Wikipedia. ~AR

artruby:

Carsten Höller. 

Carsten Höller holds a doctorate in agricultural science and other fun facts I learned about this contemporary artist with an obsession for fly-agaric mushrooms by reading Wikipedia. ~AR

(Source: valentineuhovski)

July 29, 2013
We are shelves, we are Tables, we are meek, We are edible, Nudgers and shovers In spite of ourselves. Our kind multiplies: We shall by morning Inherit the earth. 
Our foot’s in the door.
— “Mushrooms” by Sylvia Plath
Having run the gauntlet of literary criticism that was my college education, yes, I know that Sylvia’s verse isn’t quite so literal. But it works regardless! —MN

We are shelves, we are 
Tables, we are meek, 
We are edible, 

Nudgers and shovers 
In spite of ourselves. 
Our kind multiplies: 

We shall by morning 
Inherit the earth. 

Our foot’s in the door.

— “Mushrooms” by Sylvia Plath

Having run the gauntlet of literary criticism that was my college education, yes, I know that Sylvia’s verse isn’t quite so literal. But it works regardless! —MN

(Source: theorphansarms, via mycology)

July 3, 2013
mucholderthen:

Earthstars  [family Geastraceae]by ~bigredsharks

I see heaps of mycological illustrations while I’m trawling the Tumblr depths. This batch is that much lovelier than most, like it was—to tip my nerd hand a bit here—taken from a Magic: The Gathering deck. Happy quasi-weekly fungus day. —MN

mucholderthen:

Earthstars  [family Geastraceae]
by ~bigredsharks

I see heaps of mycological illustrations while I’m trawling the Tumblr depths. This batch is that much lovelier than most, like it was—to tip my nerd hand a bit here—taken from a Magic: The Gathering deck. Happy quasi-weekly fungus day. —MN

May 24, 2013

fastcompany:

Plastics like styrofoam currently take up between 25%-30% of our landfill space, and a single cubic foot of styrofoam has the same energy content as about one and a half liters of gasoline. 

College pals Eben Bayer and Gavin McIntyre established Ecovative, which grows cost-effective alternatives to plastic insulation and packaging. While they were students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Bayer and McIntyre experimented with mycelium, the network of vegetative filaments in mushrooms, and realized that it could be used to form incredibly strong bonds. Essentially, the substance functions like a glue that you can grow and use to form agricultural byproducts like plant stalks and seed husks into natural alternatives to styrofoam packaging and insulation. 

Our “mushroom guy” Roy Halling brought me samples of this stuff a few months back when a story about an artist using mycelium to make furniture was making the Tumblr rounds. It feels a little funny, but is unquestionably strong and versatile and a fantastic way forward towards replacing plastics. ~AR

April 29, 2013
I was watching a movie a while back, a dark turn on a milquetoast children’s tale that used fairy rings to foreshadow the appearance of some nasty nymphs. It was … eh, so-so. But I got to thinking about the reality of these “mystic” circles.
First off, mushroom rings aren’t mythological. They’re even pretty common, and have been known to grow in diameters upwards of 30 feet, and for years at a time. But far from a miraculous arrangement of individual fungal growths, the real cause here is not quite so fantastical.
The mushrooms you see above ground are all parts of one organism, connected below ground by the mycelium—a dense mass of stringy hyphae. Think of it like the root system for a tree, but a bit more proactive in how it absorbs nutrients. In fairy rings, the mycelium grows outward, sprouting fruiting bodies (mushrooms) after it rains.
The circle of mushrooms defines the leading edge of the mycelium, which constantly exhausts nutrients inside the ring and expands to find more, releasing enzymes as it goes. Whether or not elves have clandestine moonlight get-togethers around these rings, I couldn’t tell you. But you’ve at least got a new tidbit of info to plunk in your weird facts bucket.  —MN

I was watching a movie a while back, a dark turn on a milquetoast children’s tale that used fairy rings to foreshadow the appearance of some nasty nymphs. It was … eh, so-so. But I got to thinking about the reality of these “mystic” circles.

First off, mushroom rings aren’t mythological. They’re even pretty common, and have been known to grow in diameters upwards of 30 feet, and for years at a time. But far from a miraculous arrangement of individual fungal growths, the real cause here is not quite so fantastical.

The mushrooms you see above ground are all parts of one organism, connected below ground by the mycelium—a dense mass of stringy hyphae. Think of it like the root system for a tree, but a bit more proactive in how it absorbs nutrients. In fairy rings, the mycelium grows outward, sprouting fruiting bodies (mushrooms) after it rains.

The circle of mushrooms defines the leading edge of the mycelium, which constantly exhausts nutrients inside the ring and expands to find more, releasing enzymes as it goes. Whether or not elves have clandestine moonlight get-togethers around these rings, I couldn’t tell you. But you’ve at least got a new tidbit of info to plunk in your weird facts bucket.  —MN

(Source: gilded-reign)

December 9, 2012
Semi-weekly fungus time. It’s a good thing. —MN
whatsthmattawyou:


A pink surprise by annkelliott on Flickr.Larger, then click again
Fungi, specifically Lycogala epidendrum, photographed in Brown-Lowery Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada.

Semi-weekly fungus time. It’s a good thing. —MN

whatsthmattawyou:

A pink surprise by annkelliott on Flickr.
Larger, then click again

Fungi, specifically Lycogala epidendrum, photographed in
Brown-Lowery Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada.

(via whatsthmattawyou)

October 17, 2012
Scary story out of Connecticut where a woman who foraged mushrooms in her backyard sent her entire family to the hospital because those mushrooms happened to be highly toxic. Please remember folks: Make sure you know what you’re dealing with before you eat anything from the wild. As the article states, even mycologists aren’t right 100% of the time. Mushrooms are devilish little buggers to ID. ~AR
(via Mom Picks Backyard Mushrooms, Cooks Dinner, Hospitalizes Family: Gothamist)

Scary story out of Connecticut where a woman who foraged mushrooms in her backyard sent her entire family to the hospital because those mushrooms happened to be highly toxic. Please remember folks: Make sure you know what you’re dealing with before you eat anything from the wild. As the article states, even mycologists aren’t right 100% of the time. Mushrooms are devilish little buggers to ID. ~AR

(via Mom Picks Backyard Mushrooms, Cooks Dinner, Hospitalizes Family: Gothamist)

October 13, 2012

Trish’s timing is uncanny. Just yesterday, we happened to post a Plant Talk blurb from Dr. Roy Halling, our resident mycological maestro. His sighting of a hitherto unseen species on NYBG grounds tells us the fungal scene around here is doing just fine. —MN

trishmayo:

A Walk in the Forest: Fungus Among Us


According to the NYBG’s website “The Thain Family Forest is the largest remnant of original forest that once covered most of New York City” and it’s not hard to imagine yourself far from the city in both terms of distance and time. The quiet of the forest makes it easy to slow your pace and take the time to observe your surroundings. What I found on this early autumn walk were some amazing clusters of fungus - some look like seashells, others like a group of ladies hiding behind their fans, and one group was growing in a way that created facial features. I’m not a scientist but some quick research and I found fungus names equally fanciful and descriptive: Bracket, Orange Peel, Turkey Tail and Northern Tooth Fungus. It’s easy to love the fungus among us!

September 8, 2012
Amazon Fungi Help Create Clouds, Rain
If scientists are correct in their research, the Amazon rain forest might have just been the Amazon forest if not for mushrooms and other fungi.
The research, undertaken in an Amazon region with “pristine” air—a location where no human pollutants are detectable—has shown that it’s the fungi which contribute most to a feedback loop of wet weather. Microscopic, potassium-rich particles released by spore-launching fungi drift up into the atmosphere above the forest, “seeding” the sky for rain by providing a surface the water can condense on. This, in turn, supports the fungi and other plants down on the ground.
Before you ask, I don’t think this will create miniature thunderstorms over your home garden just because you spored the soil with all sorts of ‘shrooms. Still, science = good. —MN

Amazon Fungi Help Create Clouds, Rain

If scientists are correct in their research, the Amazon rain forest might have just been the Amazon forest if not for mushrooms and other fungi.

The research, undertaken in an Amazon region with “pristine” air—a location where no human pollutants are detectable—has shown that it’s the fungi which contribute most to a feedback loop of wet weather. Microscopic, potassium-rich particles released by spore-launching fungi drift up into the atmosphere above the forest, “seeding” the sky for rain by providing a surface the water can condense on. This, in turn, supports the fungi and other plants down on the ground.

Before you ask, I don’t think this will create miniature thunderstorms over your home garden just because you spored the soil with all sorts of ‘shrooms. Still, science = good. —MN

July 12, 2012
Happy birthday to a true plant pioneer! Little known fact: In addition to Carver’s work on peanuts and sweet potatoes, he was also an avid mycologist.

While at Iowa State, he developed a talent for collecting fungal specimens. Since mycology was a scientific discipline that required a high degree of training and sophisticated equipment for proper identification, and Carver had neither training nor equipment, he often sought the aid of trained mycologists. While his preliminary identifications were remarkably accurate, Carver’s real gift was for finding rare and new species. Throughout his career, he sent specimens to numerous mycologists and plant pathologists.

At least 100 of Carver’s fungal specimens found their way to the Garden’s Steere Herbarium, most likely through his friendship with J.B. Ellis. ~AR
uspsstamps:

Happy birthday, George Washington Carver! Born on this day in 1865, Carver improved the economy of the South by demonstrating the commercial possibilities of peanuts and sweet potatoes. His “Movable School” educated impoverished farmers. His stamp was issued 1998 as part of the Celebrate the Century: 1910s stamp pane.

Happy birthday to a true plant pioneer! Little known fact: In addition to Carver’s work on peanuts and sweet potatoes, he was also an avid mycologist.

While at Iowa State, he developed a talent for collecting fungal specimens. Since mycology was a scientific discipline that required a high degree of training and sophisticated equipment for proper identification, and Carver had neither training nor equipment, he often sought the aid of trained mycologists. While his preliminary identifications were remarkably accurate, Carver’s real gift was for finding rare and new species. Throughout his career, he sent specimens to numerous mycologists and plant pathologists.

At least 100 of Carver’s fungal specimens found their way to the Garden’s Steere Herbarium, most likely through his friendship with J.B. Ellis. ~AR

uspsstamps:

Happy birthday, George Washington Carver! Born on this day in 1865, Carver improved the economy of the South by demonstrating the commercial possibilities of peanuts and sweet potatoes. His “Movable School” educated impoverished farmers. His stamp was issued 1998 as part of the Celebrate the Century: 1910s stamp pane.

April 17, 2012
It’s been, what, an entire week since I relayed something fungal? —MN

It’s been, what, an entire week since I relayed something fungal? —MN

(Source: mycota)

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