June 5, 2014

nevver:

Through the woods, darkly - Peter Guenzel

If you can’t suss out a woodland’s native mysticism—and believe me, it’s there—add your own. Then promptly pretend you are fleeing a hungry gang of R.O.U.S.es. —MN

May 29, 2014

This year’s Great-horned Owl nest produced one adorable, suspicious little owlet that we couldn’t really talk much about ‘til now (we love birders, but too many at once can make for a stressful situation if you’re a baby feathered thing). Of course, now that the new owl has fledged and made off into the Forest with her mom, I’ve gotta share pictures.

One of our Visitor Services Attendants, Pat Gonzalez, shot these photos and more, and she was kind enough to write up a recap of her last several years following the lives of these nocturnal giants. Check it out! —MN

May 27, 2014

Today calls for an ode to green in all its permutations. Tumbling into the heat of summer and the sunburns that ride its coattails, I like to think of the ferns and trees as a sort of visual balm—something to soothe on even the fiercest afternoons.

I guarantee I’ll get lost in our woods at least once this year. Okay with it. —MN

April 2, 2014

steepravine:

California Coastal Forest Perfection

(Salt Point, California - 3/2014)

Explore more. It’s as much fun now as it was when you were a kid, but sometimes you need a refresher course. —MN

(via mycology)

December 2, 2013
Favorite sound. —MN

Favorite sound. —MN

(Source: frolicingintheforest, via theherbarium)

November 14, 2013
americanguide:

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #2
Take Pride, It’s the American Guide
YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:
The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.
We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. For your second assignment, Class I - Flora and Fauna. (And yes, these are actual questions from the manual.)  
CLASS I - FLORA and FAUNA
Are there places to which one may drive or hike where some special variety [of plant] blooms at a certain time?
List plants and trees common to your district.
Are there trees of historical interest?
List animals, birds, fish native to your district.
Are there dangerous animals?
Are there interesting animal colonies such as colonies of beavers or prairie dog cities in your district?
BE A GUIDE. SHOW AMERICA TO AMERICANS. 
Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photos,illustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.
Check out a couple of past A/G posts on flora (or fungi, in this case) and fauna. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 
This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.
#americanguideweek
Check out A/G Week assignments here.

We don’t want to put ideas into anyone’s heads, but, I mean … 50-acre Forest … In the Bronx … You know, it just might be interesting to someone out there. Maybe …? ~AR

americanguide:

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #2

Take Pride, It’s the American Guide

YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:

The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.

We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. For your second assignment, Class I - Flora and Fauna. (And yes, these are actual questions from the manual.)  

CLASS I - FLORA and FAUNA

  • Are there places to which one may drive or hike where some special variety [of plant] blooms at a certain time?
  • List plants and trees common to your district.
  • Are there trees of historical interest?
  • List animals, birds, fish native to your district.
  • Are there dangerous animals?
  • Are there interesting animal colonies such as colonies of beavers or prairie dog cities in your district?

BE A GUIDE. SHOW AMERICA TO AMERICANS. 

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photos,illustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.

Check out a couple of past A/G posts on flora (or fungi, in this case) and fauna. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 

This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

#americanguideweek

Check out A/G Week assignments here.

We don’t want to put ideas into anyone’s heads, but, I mean … 50-acre Forest … In the Bronx … You know, it just might be interesting to someone out there. Maybe …? ~AR

(Source: americanguide)

October 21, 2013
flavorpill:

Enjoying the fall weather :)

This is how fall makes us feel, too.

flavorpill:

Enjoying the fall weather :)

This is how fall makes us feel, too.

October 11, 2013

What’s beautiful now? Trees! It’s fall and the leaves are turning. As you can see, some trees are getting a jump start on the competition. How to keep track of what’s going on in the Bronx without making a weekly pilgrimage (not that we’d stop you of course, remember, Members get in free)? With our new Fall Foliage Tracker of course!

We employ some of the most knowledgeable tree specialists in New York City, and they’re out and about across our 250-acres on a daily basis. And at the end of their day, they report back to us what they’ve seen in terms of fall color. And then we update the tracker. It’s not an exact science, sure, but you show us a scientist that has invented the perfect foliage metering device, and we’ll keep you in NYBG-branded baseball caps for a year!

If you’re wondering about visiting foliage hotspots within the Garden, you should plan to visit the 50-acre Thain Family Forest (the largest remaining tract of old growth forest in New York City), the Native Plant Garden, the Azalea Garden (it’s not just azaleas!), and the Rock Garden.

If it’s flowers you’re hankering for, the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden is nothing to sniff at (groan) at this time of year, the Perennial Garden and Seasonal Walk are full of wonderful blooms, and inside the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory we’ll knock your socks off with a seasonal display of Japanese chrysanthemums in Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden.

For day-to-day updates on what we’re seeing around grounds, be sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post daily updates from our staff and visitors. Need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store.

Photos by NYBG photographer Ivo M. Vermeulen.

August 29, 2013

nevver:

Takeshi Shikama

"Time flowing ever so gently in the forests proved to be far more pleasant than the sound of the clock ticking away," [Shikama] says.

I know it’s not even autumn yet, but I figured we’d lean a bit cooler on the thermometer to close out Thursday. —MN

July 3, 2013

jeffdtaylor:

Bamboo Grove at Tenryu-ji

Your moment of zen ahead of July 4th’s endless supply of hot dogs and loud, colorful explosions. The NYBG will be open during the day for anyone looking to escape metropolis for a lark before the evening celebrations start, too. —MN

June 6, 2013

"99%." Those were the digits blossom baron Peter Kukielski tossed me as I made my way into the office this morning. Of course, his desk makes up the confetti-colored breadth of the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden, where that number signifies the state of the spring bloom. Can you tell we love to be accurate with our suspense?

By the end of this week, these roses will be 100% at the top of their game. But they’re not the only rose plants sashaying through spring—a short wander upa  nearby hill places you in sight of the EarthKind Rose Trial Beds, where an effervescent batch of specialty roses open their faces to the sky without much help from doting horticulturists.

Elsewhere, the last of the peonies are still popping in places, many cresting the hill toward their inevitable dwindling with a resigned sort of grace. The Native Plant Garden is as lively as ever, too, with prairie wildflowers hosting songbirds throughout. The Garden’s greenery, in turn, is getting seriously electric. Ten minutes on the Forest trails and the memory of those biting winter days is as good as gone. It’s likewise out among the Benenson Ornamental Conifers—just search out one of our stone pavilions, chill a while, and tell me evergreens are only good for appreciating in the cold.

Oh, and do not miss out on the waterlilies while you’re checking out Wild Medicine in the Conservatory; the real winners in that bunch are just broaching the water for a neon summer of reds, yellows, and a bit of peach. It’s a similar situation in the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, where our spring harvest of greens is just about ready for Mario Batali’s Edible Academy Family Picnic. ‘Til next week! —MN

May 30, 2013

So there are these flowers called roses … They’re kinda pretty … I mean, some people like them. They smell really good, or at least some of them do. Oh who am I kidding? Roses are awesome! And they’re looking amazing in the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden right now.

But the roses will be around all summer, if you want to spend some QT with another flower that brings out the obsessive nature in our visitors, you better get her right quick! The incredible peonies lining the road in front of the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory are as perfect as I’ve ever seen them. So, if they’re your favorite, get here asap and bliss out with your favorite flower.

Other fantastic places where you should consider chilling out in this hot, hot heat include the Native Plant Garden which is looking like the world’s most lush prairie, the Azalea Garden which is gorgeous with share and ephemeral streams, and the Perennial Garden full of shady benches and shrubs full of hummingbirds.

Looking back to last week’s highlights, everything we said then still holds! Waterlilies, shady Forest trails, and lizards in the Rock Garden are still all a go.

Wild Medicine: Healing Plants Around the World in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory continues to delight visitors with a one-two punch of geeky knowledge and Renaissance beauty. Come visit us in the Bronx and beat the heat with an easy 20-minute Metro-North ride from Grand Central Terminal!

For day-to-day updates on what we’re seeing around grounds, be sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post daily updates from our staff and visitors. Also, need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store. ~AR

May 23, 2013

The roses are back! The peonies are back! The waterlilies are back! What’s beautiful now? Summer’s garden superstars, that’s who!

It’s been a steamy, sweltering week and the flowers that love this weather have welcomed it back with open petals. This is also prime time for ornamental alliums and the beginning of the poppies (my personal favorite) in the Perennial Garden, and foxgloves along the Seasonal Walk.

But the real stars of this week have nothing to do with flowers: This week is all about leaves, and shade. Step into the 50-acre Thain Family Forest and the ambient temperature drops by several degrees. The sounds of the city fall away. Head for the Canoe Portage (marked by signs) and pull up a rock to sit alongside New York City’s only freshwater river for a spot. I guarantee you’ll feel more relaxed, and decidedly cooler, after about 10 minutes.

If you’re comparing this week to last week’s report, the Rock Garden remains a favorite sunning spot for NYBG staffers and tiny lizards, the Native Plant Garden has taken on a completely new aspect, and the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden gets more lush by the day. Unfortunately, the heat has dealt a blow to two of last week’s stars, the Azalea Garden has taken on a more muted hue, and the lilacs are fading into a gently scented memory.

Wild Medicine: Healing Plants Around the World in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory continues to delight visitors with a one-two punch of geeky knowledge and Renaissance beauty. So if you’re not heading away for the three-day weekend come visit us in the Bronx!

For day-to-day updates on what we’re seeing around grounds, be sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post daily updates from our staff and visitors. Also, need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store. ~AR

February 16, 2013
Brazil to Count Every Tree in the Amazon
Or at least come to a close-as-possible estimate, anyway. With deforestation still a significant threat to the world’s largest rain forest (despite a major reported drop in cutting since 2004), Brazil is making further moves to step up and take action. But to start, they need to know what’s there to protect.
Over the next four years, teams will be sent throughout the Brazilian wilderness (which encompasses 60% of the Amazon), recording the trees present at 20,000 different sites. That includes species IDs, population, height, diameter, soil composition and more. Not exactly a small-time undertaking.
With perseverance, Brazil is hoping to bump down deforestation by at least 80% of 2004 levels in an attempt to stave off the end of one of nature’s great accomplishments. Click through for more. —MN

Brazil to Count Every Tree in the Amazon

Or at least come to a close-as-possible estimate, anyway. With deforestation still a significant threat to the world’s largest rain forest (despite a major reported drop in cutting since 2004), Brazil is making further moves to step up and take action. But to start, they need to know what’s there to protect.

Over the next four years, teams will be sent throughout the Brazilian wilderness (which encompasses 60% of the Amazon), recording the trees present at 20,000 different sites. That includes species IDs, population, height, diameter, soil composition and more. Not exactly a small-time undertaking.

With perseverance, Brazil is hoping to bump down deforestation by at least 80% of 2004 levels in an attempt to stave off the end of one of nature’s great accomplishments. Click through for more. —MN

February 8, 2013

There’s a lacy quality to the trees in winter that breaks up the monotony of resenting the weather, even with the nor’easter bearing down on us as I type this. Little joys, right? —MN

kari-shma:

by: Jürgen Heckel

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