June 11, 2012
It seems obvious to wear pastels in spring and neutrals in fall, the colors complement what is going on in the garden, but according to this post from Gardenista about fiber artist Sasha Duerr, it goes deeper than that. Why we wear what we wear when we wear it has less to do with aesthetics, and more to do with the harvest schedule. Obvious, sure, but something I had never thought of before! ~AR

It seems obvious to wear pastels in spring and neutrals in fall, the colors complement what is going on in the garden, but according to this post from Gardenista about fiber artist Sasha Duerr, it goes deeper than that. Why we wear what we wear when we wear it has less to do with aesthetics, and more to do with the harvest schedule. Obvious, sure, but something I had never thought of before! ~AR

April 9, 2012
Colors of the Caldron
(I personally would’ve spelled it “cauldron,” but to each their own odd but kosher linguistic idiosyncrasies.)
Certain shades in the world of textile dyes are difficult to produce, such as cochineal red, from the ground remains of a specific insect; or tyrian purple, from a particular species of sea snail. But others, as Sasha Duerr well knows, are easier to come by.
She’s one of a few savvy fashionistas attempting to bring back the lost art of botanical dyes, coloring shirts with fava bean vines and hats with sour grass. And the process is simple—boil water, add plants, add fabric, enjoy the rainbow spectrum. Click through for the in-depth exploration of a reviving talent near-dead since the mid-Victorian era. —MN

Colors of the Caldron

(I personally would’ve spelled it “cauldron,” but to each their own odd but kosher linguistic idiosyncrasies.)

Certain shades in the world of textile dyes are difficult to produce, such as cochineal red, from the ground remains of a specific insect; or tyrian purple, from a particular species of sea snail. But others, as Sasha Duerr well knows, are easier to come by.

She’s one of a few savvy fashionistas attempting to bring back the lost art of botanical dyes, coloring shirts with fava bean vines and hats with sour grass. And the process is simple—boil water, add plants, add fabric, enjoy the rainbow spectrum. Click through for the in-depth exploration of a reviving talent near-dead since the mid-Victorian era. —MN

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