July 8, 2013

katabaticwind:

I think I’ve got a photo of Isiatris tinctoria for just about the entire season.  Its common name is woad and I usually describe it to non-gardeners as the plant that was used in Braveheart to make the guys blue.  One of the neat things about it is that when you remove the seeds (which you should do because it can be invasive), it will stain your hands a lovely blue color which takes a couple of days to come off.  

Isatis tinctoria makes for a decent Blue Monday. (Can we make that a thing or is New Order on the downswing with the Brooklyn set?) While woad was a super-important dye not only for warriors in western Europe, but for textiles going all the way back to ancient Egypt, it fell by the wayside with the arrival of Indian indigo (same chemical, just more potent).

The commercial woad industry collapsed a long time back, but there’s a novel equation that’s pushing it back into vogue in small ways: Internet + Bespoke Crafts = Resurgence. Anyone out there worked with woad before?

February 16, 2012

After questioning the blue of that poppy yesterday, I came up with not quite an analogue, but a perfect segue into an exploration of the color.

These images were taken in Patagonia, at the far southern tip of South America. NYBG bryologist Bill Buck’s adventures there have turned up not only fascinating plant specimens, but a slew of stunning photos from the glacial regions nearest Antarctica.

November 15, 2011
Morning Eye Candy Fall Color Week: Blue

Morning Eye Candy Fall Color Week: Blue

July 15, 2011
Another “reject” from Plant Talk’s Summer Color Week. Don’t be blue! The weekend is right around the corner!
Dragonfly in the Conservatory Courtyard Pool. Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

Another “reject” from Plant Talk’s Summer Color Week. Don’t be blue! The weekend is right around the corner!

Dragonfly in the Conservatory Courtyard Pool. Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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