April 9, 2014

Weird is good, I say. And this spring, we’re going full-tilt weird (at least botanically speaking). On April 19, we’re throwing open the doors on a brand new art exhibition that embodies the stranger side of plants. Through a partnership with the American Society of Botanical ArtistsWeird, Wild, & Wonderful showcases the results of a challenge made to a global community of painters, illustrators, and more: look beyond the simple flower.

The result is both visceral and beautiful. Head through for more info on this bizarrely enticing exhibition. —MN

(Contributing artists, clockwise from top left: Ann S. Hoffenberg, Akiko Enokido, Nancy Gehrig, and Asuka Hishiki)

April 3, 2014

artandsciencejournal:

Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen

When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.

The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.

To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.

-Anna Paluch

There’s a business opportunity here for the morbid florists out there. How visceral can you make baby’s breath, though? —MN

March 31, 2014

slowartday:

Lyndie Dourthe

Because living terrariums with their impressive lifespans still don’t offer the security of near-permanence, this batch is composed of faux flowers; sewn, stuffed mushrooms; and at least one florally inspired human heart. —MN

(via scopeartshow)

March 23, 2014

hahamagartconnect:

SPOTLIGHT: KEHINDE WILEY

American Artist, Kehinde Wiley's work is a colorful blend of traditional and contemporary roots seen in his trademark over sized portraits where young men of color, posed in their street clothes are fixed into grandiose backgrounds that suit them as if they were royalty. Initially his portraits were based on the photographs of young men in Harlem, now he has firmly situated himself as the painter known to travel to urban places in Israel, Africa, Brazil and India to find his next subject…

Come join us on hahamag.com & Twitter to finish the conversation and learn some fun facts about Wiley.

I’m just all about these. S’all. —MN

March 11, 2014

From Ocean to Ornament

To think that such a humble jumble of chlorophyllic flotsam could be coaxed into these beautiful shapes and letters. In the 19th century, home handicrafts often went far above and beyond the simple scrapbook, and this Victorian collection of lace-framed seaweed pressings is no exception. Created by Eliza A. Jordson in Brooklyn, L.I. (this predates the absorption of Brooklyn as a New York City borough), it now resides in the Brooklyn Museum's special collections.

Click through for a gallery of elegant and painstaking craftwork. It’s not often you see simple seaweed so lovingly posed. —MN

March 2, 2014
exercicedestyle:

Coelacanth Pinecone Fish

It’s Sunday. Maybe you’re making the Shangri-La of brunches happen at this very moment. Or maybe you’re contemplating the hybridization of a conifer and a living fossil fish. Either way, righteous effort. —MN

exercicedestyle:

Coelacanth Pinecone Fish

It’s Sunday. Maybe you’re making the Shangri-La of brunches happen at this very moment. Or maybe you’re contemplating the hybridization of a conifer and a living fossil fish. Either way, righteous effort. —MN

(via past)

February 2, 2014

skunkbear:

I’ve been seeing a lot of icicles lately, and they always remind me of Andy Goldsworthy.  He’s a British artist who makes natural sculptures, putting together twigs, grass, leaves and rocks with nothing but his hands.

These are moments from “Rivers and Tides,” a 2001 documentary by Thomas Riedelsheimer that follows Goldsworthy as he works.  The artist’s process seems like it would be incredibly frustrating (especially with frozen hands) but the delicately balanced results are amazing.

Andy Goldsworthy is just one of the landscape artists whose work is featured in our current exhibition, Close: A Journey in Scotland The Photography of Allan Pollok-Morris.

December 9, 2013
thetuesdayafter:

Luna Paiva at Luciano Brito

Succulents cast in bronze and polished to shiny perfection? Yes please!

thetuesdayafter:

Luna Paiva at Luciano Brito

Succulents cast in bronze and polished to shiny perfection? Yes please!

November 6, 2013

odditiesoflife:

Incredible Feather Art

Using feathers acquired from zoos and private aviaries, artist Chris Maynard creates delicately constructed scenes of birds with feathers. The artist admits to being “feather obsessed” and is fascinated not only with birds and flight, but with the color and texture of their plumage which he explores through his small dioramas. You can see much more on his website and Gerald Peters Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico will soon be showing some of Maynard’s larger work.

source

I’m not an ornithologist, but I recognize five of the six birds above, and know for sure that you can see at least four of them at the Garden if you time it correctly (the timing being predicated upon whether or not one of the Bronx Zoo’s peacocks has flown the coop and come for a visit. Yes I’m serious). What a beautiful way to celebrate these birds, both common and exotic! ~AR

(via odditiesoflife)

November 5, 2013

wetheurban:

ART: The Beautiful Life and Death of 10,000 Roses

Using all kinds of materials, including trees, flowers, candles, sand, and ice, London-based artist Anya Gallaccio creates site-specific artworks that explore the ephemerality of nature.

In particular, Red on Green is a stunning display of 10,000 fresh roses that were arranged within a gallery space. Gallaccio pulled the heads off of the roses and arranged them into a tightly packed rectangle.

Read More

Can you imagine the aroma? Like the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at dawn on a cool June morning I bet. Gorgeous and thought provoking! ~AR

November 3, 2013
"Ephemeral" is an apt way to describe some of the landscape art photographed by Allan Pollok-Morris during his five-year odyssey in Scotland. Other times, there’s an impenetrable permanence to it. Countless photographs later, we have Close: Landscape Design and Land Art in Scotland, a book of works from artists both native and foreign that captures the challenge and beauty of landscape design in the rugged Scottish countryside.
We’re holding an exhibition of Pollok-Morris’ photographs in our Ross Gallery right now. It runs through March 16. Check out our interview with the artist here, accompanied by a few images from the gallery. —MN

"Ephemeral" is an apt way to describe some of the landscape art photographed by Allan Pollok-Morris during his five-year odyssey in Scotland. Other times, there’s an impenetrable permanence to it. Countless photographs later, we have Close: Landscape Design and Land Art in Scotland, a book of works from artists both native and foreign that captures the challenge and beauty of landscape design in the rugged Scottish countryside.

We’re holding an exhibition of Pollok-Morris’ photographs in our Ross Gallery right now. It runs through March 16. Check out our interview with the artist here, accompanied by a few images from the gallery. —MN

October 21, 2013
artruby:

Carsten Höller. 

Carsten Höller holds a doctorate in agricultural science and other fun facts I learned about this contemporary artist with an obsession for fly-agaric mushrooms by reading Wikipedia. ~AR

artruby:

Carsten Höller. 

Carsten Höller holds a doctorate in agricultural science and other fun facts I learned about this contemporary artist with an obsession for fly-agaric mushrooms by reading Wikipedia. ~AR

(Source: valentineuhovski)

October 19, 2013
ponytailjournalbreakfast:

(THIS IS NOT MY PICTURE) but them flowers be cray.

Behold a page of the Codex Seraphinianus, a nonsensical encyclopedia for a fictional world produced in the late ’70s by eccentric Italian designer and architect Luigi Serafini. He applied as much whimsy and madness to his designs of flora and fauna as he did the completely invented—if consistent—written language used in the book. —MN

ponytailjournalbreakfast:

(THIS IS NOT MY PICTURE) but them flowers be cray.

Behold a page of the Codex Seraphinianus, a nonsensical encyclopedia for a fictional world produced in the late ’70s by eccentric Italian designer and architect Luigi Serafini. He applied as much whimsy and madness to his designs of flora and fauna as he did the completely invented—if consistent—written language used in the book. —MN

October 12, 2013

myampgoesto11:

Wayne Simpson: from the series Intimate Scenes

I see you, autumn earthtones, and winter’s there in line behind you. —MN

(via squirrelonsquirrel)

October 5, 2013

brilliantbotany:

I visited the Harvard Museum of Natural History today, and one of their current exhibits is Glass Flowers, a truly astounding collection of glass plant models created by Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka from 1886 to 1936. They created nearly 4,400 models by hand out of glass with wire reinforcement. I could barely wrap my head around the time and skill that went into the collection. The models range across plant families and feature both actual size models as well as larger anatomical pieces.

If you live in the Boston area, definitely check out the museum and this exhibit.

These glass flowers are worth a visit from anywhere. Utterly mind blowing. ~AR

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