February 11, 2014
dianeabroad:

The Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens [Los Angeles]

Oh I’m sorry, you were saying something about a polar vortex?

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Harsh, but fair. Kind of …. ~AR

dianeabroad:

The Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens [Los Angeles]

Oh I’m sorry, you were saying something about a polar vortex?

View Post

Harsh, but fair. Kind of …. ~AR

May 9, 2013

What’s beautiful now? If you ask our horticulturists they’ll say one thing: rain. It’s been a pretty dry spring, and while we have the ability to water deeply, there’s just nothing a plant loves more than an old fashioned rain storm. And like the adage says: May showers bring May flowers …. er, or something.

Just in time for Mother’s Day, we’re seeing a real turn towards the later spring flowers now, away from the cherry blossoms and daffodils of early spring. This week is all about flowering shrubs like lilacs, azaleas, and tree peonies. And then there are the tulips. Oh sooooo many tulips! In an absolute riot of color all over the Home Gardening Center.

In the newly opened Native Plant Garden things are a little more subdued, but still so lovely. Expect lots of beautiful dogwoods and gorgeous drifts of foam flower, Tiarella cordifolia. In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, the Otto Pizza Garden beds, part of Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens are looking unmistakably pizza-like.

What’s still beautiful from last week? The Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden has another bloom every day. On Tuesday it was Rosa nutkana. By this weekend there should be a handful more in bloom. The Azalea Garden just gets better with each passing day, and the Native Plant Garden is just awesome, the perfect place to celebrate your mom on Sunday.

So, ready to come hang out with us in the Bronx? Here’s everything you need to know. For day-to-day updates on what we’re seeing around grounds, be sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post daily updates from our staff and visitors. Also, need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store. ~AR

October 3, 2012
I will admit to having made reference to the Old Farmer’s Almanac in deciding when to plant parts of my garden. My mother—who is a very serious gardener—swears by it. What about you? ~AR
mothernaturenetwork:

Do serious gardeners still read The Old Farmer’s Almanac?When planning their crops, millions of gardeners turn to The Old Farmer’s Alamnac — in print, online and on mobile apps.

I will admit to having made reference to the Old Farmer’s Almanac in deciding when to plant parts of my garden. My mother—who is a very serious gardener—swears by it. What about you? ~AR

mothernaturenetwork:

Do serious gardeners still read The Old Farmer’s Almanac?
When planning their crops, millions of gardeners turn to The Old Farmer’s Alamnac — in print, online and on mobile apps.

April 26, 2012
Spring Sprang Early: Should We Worry?

Should we be battening down the hatches and sounding DEFCON 3 over this warmer-than-seems-sane spring? Not quite. So says Robert Naczi, curator of North American Botany here at the NYBG.

Rather than catastrophic evidence of radical climate change, Naczi says that this seemingly drastic shift to warmer weather is well within the range of experience for plants native to our area. Is there a warming trend? Yes, but this year’s bizarro weather is likely less attributed to overall climate change than it is a climate pattern known as the North Atlantic Oscillation.

Confused? It’s okay. Click through for a video interview with the brainiacs behind the science. —MN

April 20, 2012
Much has been made of this spring’s warm weather. Many have predicted that it is the new normal, others have called for caution, and many have started pointing to Henry David Thoreau.
Why Thoreau? Many reasons. Thoreau’s “Walden,” had been for many an introduction to environmental movement, and a rallying cry for ecological protection. But another reason is that Thoreau was an early phenologist. Over the course of many years he recorded the earliest bloom times or migratory arrivals of over 300 species in a series of notebooks and charts. These notes now allow scientists like Richard B. Primack, a biology professor at Boston University, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing, of Acadia National Park, and the illustrator Becca Stadtlander to draw some slightly worrying conclusions in the New York Times.
What do you think? Do you think the environment has irrevocably changed? Do you think non-existent winters and hot, dry springs are the new normal? ~AR

Much has been made of this spring’s warm weather. Many have predicted that it is the new normal, others have called for caution, and many have started pointing to Henry David Thoreau.

Why Thoreau? Many reasons. Thoreau’s “Walden,” had been for many an introduction to environmental movement, and a rallying cry for ecological protection. But another reason is that Thoreau was an early phenologist. Over the course of many years he recorded the earliest bloom times or migratory arrivals of over 300 species in a series of notebooks and charts. These notes now allow scientists like Richard B. Primack, a biology professor at Boston University, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing, of Acadia National Park, and the illustrator Becca Stadtlander to draw some slightly worrying conclusions in the New York Times.


What do you think? Do you think the environment has irrevocably changed? Do you think non-existent winters and hot, dry springs are the new normal? ~AR

March 26, 2012
Handling Tonight’s Hard Freeze
Some of us may have let our optimism over the early spring warmth get away from us. Weather reports for the NYC area suggest we’re looking at a hard freeze overnight, meaning question marks for the many flowering plants that woke up a bit too early.
Thankfully, not all is doom and gloom, as our acting Director of Outdoor Gardens will tell you. We asked Kristin Schleiter to give us the good with the bad. And if you have concerns about how your colorful spring inflorescence will manage this evening, you may want to give it a glance. —MN

Handling Tonight’s Hard Freeze

Some of us may have let our optimism over the early spring warmth get away from us. Weather reports for the NYC area suggest we’re looking at a hard freeze overnight, meaning question marks for the many flowering plants that woke up a bit too early.

Thankfully, not all is doom and gloom, as our acting Director of Outdoor Gardens will tell you. We asked Kristin Schleiter to give us the good with the bad. And if you have concerns about how your colorful spring inflorescence will manage this evening, you may want to give it a glance. —MN

March 25, 2012
Mild Winter = Hot Summer? Not Exactly
Take this for what it’s worth—to quote the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) deputy director, they “don’t give guarantees in the climate business.” (Not that any of you are citing the morning weather report as gospel.) But fears of an easy winter leading to a scorching summer are likely exaggerated.
Instead, we’re probably in for a slightly-warmer-than-average summer, and very little flooding (the other concern preoccupying the meteorologically fretful). This is pure relief for New Yorkers if it plays out. But in places like Texas, where an ongoing drought is the biggest issue on everyone’s mind, the thought of a summer with little rain is devastating. —MN

Mild Winter = Hot Summer? Not Exactly

Take this for what it’s worth—to quote the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) deputy director, they “don’t give guarantees in the climate business.” (Not that any of you are citing the morning weather report as gospel.) But fears of an easy winter leading to a scorching summer are likely exaggerated.

Instead, we’re probably in for a slightly-warmer-than-average summer, and very little flooding (the other concern preoccupying the meteorologically fretful). This is pure relief for New Yorkers if it plays out. But in places like Texas, where an ongoing drought is the biggest issue on everyone’s mind, the thought of a summer with little rain is devastating. —MN

March 12, 2012
Plants Boldly Go Where They've Never Gone Before

The PBS NewsHour blog takes a look at what may (or may not) be the effects of a changing climate on gardens across the United States, including at NYBG's own Ladies’ Border. Why the hedged language? Because some of the changes outlined in the USDA’s new plant hardiness zone map have been brought about by better technology.

But, anecdotally, it really does feel like weather patterns are changing, from the southwest to the northeast. What do you think? Have you noticed any changes in the plants you can grow in your garden? ~AR

February 22, 2012
Warm Winter Leads to Early Blooms in Northeast
Notice anything particularly odd about your northeastern  garden this year? We have, as you’ll gather if you so much as glance at  any of the NYBG's social media feeds: there's regular talk of this  bizarrely warm winter and the early blooms it brings along. And if you  were to visit the NYBG right now for a look at flowering plants that in  years past would still be waiting for the alarm clock of spring, you'd  be surprised at what you found.
"We’re having earlier springs," says professor David Wolfe, part of  Cornell’s Department of Horticulture. In conjunction with Kristin  Schleiter, the NYBG’s acting Director of Outdoor Collections, NPR's  brief foray into this awkward season leaves us wondering if the warmth  will be a trending topic in coming years, or only a fluke visitor for  the 2011/2012 winter.
Either way, an early spring means early flowers, and that makes the Garden even more of a destination. Get here now!

Warm Winter Leads to Early Blooms in Northeast

Notice anything particularly odd about your northeastern garden this year? We have, as you’ll gather if you so much as glance at any of the NYBG's social media feeds: there's regular talk of this bizarrely warm winter and the early blooms it brings along. And if you were to visit the NYBG right now for a look at flowering plants that in years past would still be waiting for the alarm clock of spring, you'd be surprised at what you found.

"We’re having earlier springs," says professor David Wolfe, part of Cornell’s Department of Horticulture. In conjunction with Kristin Schleiter, the NYBG’s acting Director of Outdoor Collections, NPR's brief foray into this awkward season leaves us wondering if the warmth will be a trending topic in coming years, or only a fluke visitor for the 2011/2012 winter.

Either way, an early spring means early flowers, and that makes the Garden even more of a destination. Get here now!

February 5, 2012
Like a warm, fuzzy memory … that dusting of snow a few weekends ago. Winter 2012, you have been so weird. Thank you Cindy for this beautiful reminder!~AR

Like a warm, fuzzy memory … that dusting of snow a few weekends ago. Winter 2012, you have been so weird. Thank you Cindy for this beautiful reminder!~AR

February 2, 2012
Meet Charles G Hogg

timeoutnewyork:

guardian:

If he sees his shadow and scurries back inside in fright, this means six more weeks of winter; if he doesn’t, we can expect an early spring.

In a bid to elevate Chuck to his rightful place in the pantheon of great weather rodents, the Guardian travelled to the zoo on Wednesday for a rare and exclusive interview.

This blog is Team Chuck.

Charles G. Hogg gets our vote, too!

February 1, 2012

This glorious weather has the flowers on the Ladies’ Border blooming extra early. If you visit this week you can expect to see (pictured above, top to bottom, left to right):

Adonis amurensis (a cheery yellow and rare perennial flower)

Viburnum (they smell divine!)

Galanthus (snowdrops)

Jasminum nudiflorum (yellow winter jasmine sans aroma)

Hellebore (also known as Lenten Rose)

Prunus mume (a beautiful Japanese apricot)

and the positively intoxicating smelling Mahonia bealai.

~AR

January 27, 2012

Pictures from (what turned out to be) a beautiful late-January day.

Says Sarah Paulson, Coordinator of Teen Programs in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, “Hellebores are opening and daffodils are coming up in Plant Part Paradise! Bulbs are also popping up between bald Cyprus knees on Adventure Trail!”

Oh, and there’s ducks, even more ducks than yesterday!

January 7, 2012
Here’s something I never knew: When it’s going to be icy cold in Florida, fruit growers spay their plants with water to encase them in ice in order to protect them. The ice insulates the fruits and flowers and keeps them from being damaged. It’s a fascinating world out there! ~AR

Here’s something I never knew: When it’s going to be icy cold in Florida, fruit growers spay their plants with water to encase them in ice in order to protect them. The ice insulates the fruits and flowers and keeps them from being damaged. It’s a fascinating world out there! ~AR

January 6, 2012
It’s going to be really nice out again this weekend. Come take a walk in the Forest, and meet our trees, some of whom are older than the United States!

It’s going to be really nice out again this weekend. Come take a walk in the Forest, and meet our trees, some of whom are older than the United States!

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