December 26, 2013
untappedcities:

5 Places to Find the Outdoors in the Bronx, the Borough with the Most Parks in NYC http://ift.tt/1ezRqSw

The Bronx really is a fantastic place! Come visit!

untappedcities:

5 Places to Find the Outdoors in the Bronx, the Borough with the Most Parks in NYC http://ift.tt/1ezRqSw

The Bronx really is a fantastic place! Come visit!

December 13, 2013
anthrocentric:

History of American Urban Squirrel

Until recently, Etienne Benson, an assistant professor in the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of History and Sociology of Science, has trained his academic eye on the history of conservation of large, charismatic wildlife, such as tigers, grizzly bears and orcas.
With his latest publication, however, he consciously chose to investigate a creature that may be considered less exotic, and is certainly smaller.
"I wanted to write about something a bit closer to home, about things we see and encounter every day," Benson said. "I wanted to shift the focus to the urban and the quotidian and, in some sense, the trivial, to see what we can learn by looking at trivial nature, or nature that is at risk of being interpreted as trivial."
So he turned his attention to the squirrel.
His paper, “The Urbanization of the Eastern Gray Squirrel in the United States,” published in the December issue of the Journal of American History, examines how the now-ubiquitous bushy-tailed critters found homes in American cities, and how their presence there altered people’s conceptions of nature and community.
Benson explains that though many people may think that squirrels have simply persisted in urban landscapes since Europeans arrived in the U.S., their presence is actually the result of intentional introductions. 
[read more]


Absolutely fascinating. Who knew that the existence of our resident squirrels was due to so many 19th-century moral and humanistic movements? ~AR

anthrocentric:

History of American Urban Squirrel

Until recently, Etienne Benson, an assistant professor in the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of History and Sociology of Science, has trained his academic eye on the history of conservation of large, charismatic wildlife, such as tigers, grizzly bears and orcas.

With his latest publication, however, he consciously chose to investigate a creature that may be considered less exotic, and is certainly smaller.

"I wanted to write about something a bit closer to home, about things we see and encounter every day," Benson said. "I wanted to shift the focus to the urban and the quotidian and, in some sense, the trivial, to see what we can learn by looking at trivial nature, or nature that is at risk of being interpreted as trivial."

So he turned his attention to the squirrel.

His paper, “The Urbanization of the Eastern Gray Squirrel in the United States,” published in the December issue of the Journal of American History, examines how the now-ubiquitous bushy-tailed critters found homes in American cities, and how their presence there altered people’s conceptions of nature and community.

Benson explains that though many people may think that squirrels have simply persisted in urban landscapes since Europeans arrived in the U.S., their presence is actually the result of intentional introductions. 

[read more]

Absolutely fascinating. Who knew that the existence of our resident squirrels was due to so many 19th-century moral and humanistic movements? ~AR

October 17, 2013
untappedcities:

The Man-Made Areas of NYC: Governor’s Island, Ellis Island, Freshkills Park, Battery Park, Marble Hill, U Thant Island

Some of the city’s most well known landmarks are actually man-made creations, often as a result of large building projects. The Bronx (our home borough) is represented in this list for the little part of Manhattan still attached to the mainland of the United States. Do you know which neighborhood we’re talking about? ~AR

untappedcities:

The Man-Made Areas of NYC: Governor’s Island, Ellis Island, Freshkills Park, Battery Park, Marble Hill, U Thant Island

Some of the city’s most well known landmarks are actually man-made creations, often as a result of large building projects. The Bronx (our home borough) is represented in this list for the little part of Manhattan still attached to the mainland of the United States. Do you know which neighborhood we’re talking about? ~AR

August 22, 2013
The Happiest and Saddest Places in New York City, According to Twitter

Thanks to your Twitter activity, we’re ranked as one of the happiest places in New York City—and we even took a podium spot among parks! Pretty hyped about that, gotta be honest.

This isn’t the first time analysts have used the tone of tweets to try and pin down happiness quotients, but it certainly provides some of the most interesting differentiations between not only areas of the city, but types of spaces. —MN

June 17, 2013
The benefits of working at the NYBG are too many to rattle off here, but prime among them is the seclusion—the ability to disappear into the woods for an hour and shut out the city. You’d think this was a rare phenomenon in NYC, and you’d be right, depending on where you are. But with a little searching (and a few subway trains), it’s not as tough as you might think to suss out nature.
Seeing as we were plugged in alongside some of our best buddies in the natural beauty department, I thought I’d share this list of outdoor escapes in New York. Don’t limit yourself to your neighborhood dog park! —MN

The benefits of working at the NYBG are too many to rattle off here, but prime among them is the seclusion—the ability to disappear into the woods for an hour and shut out the city. You’d think this was a rare phenomenon in NYC, and you’d be right, depending on where you are. But with a little searching (and a few subway trains), it’s not as tough as you might think to suss out nature.

Seeing as we were plugged in alongside some of our best buddies in the natural beauty department, I thought I’d share this list of outdoor escapes in New York. Don’t limit yourself to your neighborhood dog park! —MN

April 6, 2013
Feeling Anxious? Take A Walk in the Park - Nicole Capo

All the more reason to come visit us now that spring has arrived (kind of)!
 ~AR

stoweboyd:

This story should be titled ‘Feeling Fatigued?’ because a walk in the woods — or just looking out the window at nature — can recharge us.

Feeling Anxious? Take A Walk in the Park - Nicole Capo

A new study out of Scotland proves that our minds actually calm down when we’re surrounded by nature instead of the bustling chaos of the city, allowing us to reach a more meditative state. The study used mobile electroencephalograms (or EEGs, for short) to measure the brainwaves of participants as they took a walk through a quiet — but still urban — historic district, a park, and a noisy city center in Edinburgh. What the researchers found was that wave patterns related to frustration and “directed attention” occurred during the city walks, and that the brains of the volunteers became mentally quieter during the walk through the park.

Professor Jenny Roe, who oversaw the study, explained that natural environments still engage our brains, but the attention is involuntary and effortless, meaning we can enjoy the environment around us but still contemplate other things. The beneficial effects of natural environments can even be enjoyed just by looking out your window at a nice, green landscape, and people who live near green areas tend to have lower levels of cortisol — a stress-related hormone — in their saliva. Likewise, children with attention deficit disorders have an easier time focusing on their work if they take a break to stroll through the park.

And we are all of us a bit stressed after a few hours of city life, or just swimming in the stream on line.

February 5, 2013
We’re so honored that you guys (yes you!) have made us one of the ten best things in New York city to do in the great outdoors! Look at that list! The next time someone says to you “I’m bored, there’s nothing to do in this town.” grab them by the wrist and haul them to an of these places. They’re all winners in my book. And don’t forget to check-in when you’re here (or at any of these places for that matter). You just might get a spiffy new badge for it! ~AR

We’re so honored that you guys (yes you!) have made us one of the ten best things in New York city to do in the great outdoors! Look at that list! The next time someone says to you “I’m bored, there’s nothing to do in this town.” grab them by the wrist and haul them to an of these places. They’re all winners in my book. And don’t forget to check-in when you’re here (or at any of these places for that matter). You just might get a spiffy new badge for it! ~AR

April 9, 2012
"Restored parks and gardens bring environmental benefits like stormwater capture, and cleaner air that is cooler in the hot summer. These benefits ultimately create a healthier and happier city. But green improvements only add economic and social value to communities if they are adequately maintained. We all want a sustainable environment, and sustainable parks are maintainable parks."

— Our friends at New Yorkers for Parks have a beautifully written op-ed in Monday’s Daily News arguing against cuts to the budgets of parks and green spaces across the city. What do you think? Do parks, gardens, and open spaces make the city a better place to live? ~AR

August 4, 2011
Mary Krauski gives new meaning to the term “community gardener.” A few years ago she became despondent over the weeds growing in her local park, the Lisbon Community Park in Wisconsin, so she started weeding … on the sly. After years of feeling like a deviant for trying to keep her park beautiful, Krauski is now completely above board, and hoping to inspire others. What a lovely story!

Mary Krauski gives new meaning to the term “community gardener.” A few years ago she became despondent over the weeds growing in her local park, the Lisbon Community Park in Wisconsin, so she started weeding … on the sly. After years of feeling like a deviant for trying to keep her park beautiful, Krauski is now completely above board, and hoping to inspire others. What a lovely story!

July 30, 2011
Enjoy Park Greenery, City Says, but Not as Salad

When visiting the city’s parks (which includes the Garden), please don’t pick the daisies, or blueberries, or American ginger, or mountain mint, etc., etc., etc.

June 10, 2011
Calling these protest plantings in Madrid “ecosystems” is going a step too far (as is calling the cake protectors covering them “greenhouses”), but the impetus behind their installation is noble: To protest a lack of greens paces in the city’s center.

Calling these protest plantings in Madrid “ecosystems” is going a step too far (as is calling the cake protectors covering them “greenhouses”), but the impetus behind their installation is noble: To protest a lack of greens paces in the city’s center.

April 25, 2011
popmech:

A bridge (made of trees) grows in Brooklyn: Ted Zoli’s new design for the winding elevated footpath that will connect the promenade to lovely but difficult-to-access Brooklyn Bridge Park.

popmech:

A bridge (made of trees) grows in Brooklyn: Ted Zoli’s new design for the winding elevated footpath that will connect the promenade to lovely but difficult-to-access Brooklyn Bridge Park.

March 18, 2011
Andrew Haswell Green

A look at the man who literally began Greening New York City in the 19th century.

Andrew Haswell Green is unquestionably one of the greatest New Yorkers of all time. And if you asked, “Who?”—it’s no wonder. He’s been overlooked by a city that managed to give operetta composer Victor Herbert a statue in Central Park but could only find room to give Green a bench.

March 6, 2011
"For those who can take the heat and cope with the pollen, spending more time in nature might have some surprising health benefits. In a series of studies, scientists found that when people swap their concrete confines for a few hours in more natural surroundings — forests, parks and other places with plenty of trees — they experience increased immune function."

The New York Times - The Claim: Exposure to Plants and Parks Can Boost Immunity

February 20, 2011

Namibia has designated its entire coastline as a national park. “The Namib-Skeleton Coast National Park covers 26.6 million acres, making it larger than Portugal” and “stretches for 976 miles (1,570km), from the Kunene River, at the northern border with Angola, to the Orange River, on the border with South Africa, and is expected to be promoted as a unified destination.

Namibia has designated its entire coastline as a national park. “The Namib-Skeleton Coast National Park covers 26.6 million acres, making it larger than Portugal” and “stretches for 976 miles (1,570km), from the Kunene River, at the northern border with Angola, to the Orange River, on the border with South Africa, and is expected to be promoted as a unified destination.

12:51pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZV1L5y3B0BT_
(View comments  
Filed under: Parks Plants People 
Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »