July 9, 2013
"My father, who lived to 94, often said that the 80s had been one of the most enjoyable decades of his life. He felt, as I begin to feel, not a shrinking but an enlargement of mental life and perspective. One has had a long experience of life, not only one’s own life, but others’, too. One has seen triumphs and tragedies, booms and busts, revolutions and wars, great achievements and deep ambiguities, too. One has seen grand theories rise, only to be toppled by stubborn facts. One is more conscious of transience and, perhaps, of beauty. At 80, one can take a long view and have a vivid, lived sense of history not possible at an earlier age. I can imagine, feel in my bones, what a century is like, which I could not do when I was 40 or 60. I do not think of old age as an ever grimmer time that one must somehow endure and make the best of, but as a time of leisure and freedom, freed from the factitious urgencies of earlier days, free to explore whatever I wish, and to bind the thoughts and feelings of a lifetime together."

Absolutely beautiful meditation by legendary neurologist Oliver Sacks, who turns 80 today, on the joy of growing old.

Pair with Sacks on memory and creativity.

(via explore-blog)

Dr. Sacks has been a great friend to our Garden for many years. And we plan to spend many more in his company! Happy 80th, Oliver. MN

(Source: , via peterprato)

July 9, 2012
livefromthenypl:

vintageanchor:

“My religion is nature. That’s what arouses those feelings of wonder and mysticism and gratitude in me.”  ―Oliver Sacks
British neurologist Oliver Sacks was born today in 1933.

Happy Birthday, Oliver Sacks! Sacks gave the annual Robert B. Silvers lecture at LIVE on September 21, 2009. Watch/listen to his lecture titled, “Hallucinations”, here…

Happy birthday, Dr. Sacks! As a card-carrying member of the American Fern Society and Friend of the Garden, we thought it only right to wish him well on this, his 79th anniversary of being a cocktail of brilliant and awesome.
Oaxaca Journal is still one of the most engaging reads I’ve tucked into in years, non-fiction or otherwise. And just bask in the glory of that t-shirt. —MN

livefromthenypl:

vintageanchor:

“My religion is nature. That’s what arouses those feelings of wonder and mysticism and gratitude in me.”
―Oliver Sacks

British neurologist Oliver Sacks was born today in 1933.

Happy Birthday, Oliver Sacks! Sacks gave the annual Robert B. Silvers lecture at LIVE on September 21, 2009. Watch/listen to his lecture titled, “Hallucinations”, here…

Happy birthday, Dr. Sacks! As a card-carrying member of the American Fern Society and Friend of the Garden, we thought it only right to wish him well on this, his 79th anniversary of being a cocktail of brilliant and awesome.

Oaxaca Journal is still one of the most engaging reads I’ve tucked into in years, non-fiction or otherwise. And just bask in the glory of that t-shirt. —MN

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

June 4, 2012
beckybrinkman:

Crepidomanes minutum is a filmy fern (Hymenophyllaceae) native to the Waimea Valley, O’ahu, Hawaii. The leaf blade of a filmy fern is usually only one cell thick.
Filmy ferns are restricted to rainforest habitats that are continuously moistened by spray from waterfalls or seeps. They have existed since the Upper Triassic 200 mya., when many of the first dinosaurs evolved.

Ever since reading Oliver Sacks’ Oaxaca Journal, I’ve been mulling over the intrinsic beauty and mystery of ferns. And, I know, “mystery of ferns” sounds like an optimistic textbook chapter in a freshman biology course. But plants this ancient can’t help but have a fascinating air about them.
And a leaf blade one cell thick? Imagine if humans had that problem. Full-contact sports would be horrible. —MN

beckybrinkman:

Crepidomanes minutum is a filmy fern (Hymenophyllaceae) native to the Waimea Valley, O’ahu, Hawaii. The leaf blade of a filmy fern is usually only one cell thick.

Filmy ferns are restricted to rainforest habitats that are continuously moistened by spray from waterfalls or seeps. They have existed since the Upper Triassic 200 mya., when many of the first dinosaurs evolved.

Ever since reading Oliver Sacks’ Oaxaca Journal, I’ve been mulling over the intrinsic beauty and mystery of ferns. And, I know, “mystery of ferns” sounds like an optimistic textbook chapter in a freshman biology course. But plants this ancient can’t help but have a fascinating air about them.

And a leaf blade one cell thick? Imagine if humans had that problem. Full-contact sports would be horrible. —MN

February 14, 2011
"Where do you go to be alone?
The New York Botanical Garden. I especially like the old-growth forest there; few people realize that the garden includes 50 acres of woodlands that have never been cut — probably the only virgin forest left in the city. It gives you an idea of what the whole place might have looked like before the Europeans arrived."

New York Magazine - Daily Intel: Oliver Sacks

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