February 8, 2014

swankyfunk:

Massive Ice Age boulders and a fallen tree at the New York Botanical Garden. See more from this adventure in the woods here:

http://notabutterfly.dreamwidth.org/283436.html

If you can stand the cold, winter is an excellent time to come tromp through our woods! ~AR

January 26, 2014

acepilots:

Tropical Paradise exhibit, in the Enid Haupt Conservatory, NY Botanical Garden, in the Bronx

This is a good reminder that visiting Tropical Paradise can be very rewarding! There’s a photo contest going on, and all are invited to enter! ~AR

January 19, 2014
thegreatjustine:

Botanical Garden. 🍃

If I were to play favorites, I would consider this room of the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory to be the best one to hang out in at this time of year. But I’m not allowed to do that, right? ~AR

thegreatjustine:

Botanical Garden. 🍃

If I were to play favorites, I would consider this room of the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory to be the best one to hang out in at this time of year. But I’m not allowed to do that, right? ~AR

January 11, 2014

klnwhooha:

Can I just say, I’ll NEVER get tired of the New York Botanical Garden? It already amazed me during the fall season. Now winter? GORGEOUS!! :D

And we’ll never get tired of seeing your photos! Thanks for tagging us! ~AR

January 8, 2014

rozdoz:

New York Botanical Garden Holiday Train Show 2013

Toot toot! The Holiday Train Show closes this weekend! Come and see it before it’s too late!

January 1, 2014

michaelvcalcagno:

New York Botanical Gardens Holiday Train Show

We’re open today! New Year’s Day is a great time to visit the Holiday Train Show and to get outside and work off any, ahem, excesses, you might be suffering from. ~AR

December 28, 2013

lifejournalplant:

The Holiday Train Show at the NYBG! Braved the wintery, snowy day to find some solace in the Conservatory with holiday music, people, lovely plants, and beautiful botanical building models and trains. I wish I could have stayed a lot longer!

Braving winter weather for a visit to the Garden always pays off in beautiful photographic dividends! ~AR

December 26, 2013
untappedcities:

5 Places to Find the Outdoors in the Bronx, the Borough with the Most Parks in NYC http://ift.tt/1ezRqSw

The Bronx really is a fantastic place! Come visit!

untappedcities:

5 Places to Find the Outdoors in the Bronx, the Borough with the Most Parks in NYC http://ift.tt/1ezRqSw

The Bronx really is a fantastic place! Come visit!

December 17, 2013
bronxhipster:

The City Island Branch Library has the distinction of being the very first public library to serve the outer boroughs. The library, which is currently located between Bay and Fordham Streets, was established in 1911— the same year as the main branch on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street.
On the outside, the building is somewhat evocative of a tugboat — portholes and all. On the inside, you’ll find the largest collection of maritime fiction and non-fiction books in New York City. The more than 1,000 tomes comprising the collection cover a variety of nautical topics, including the America’s Cup, boat construction, lighthouses, naval history, pirates, and shipwrecks.
When the library was enlarged and renovated In 1997, a patio was added in the backyard. For the past five years the Garden Club of City Island has used part of the backyard for a public garden, which it helps the library staff ftend and water. The productive little plot yields salad fixings (lettuce and cherry tomatoes), herbs (basil, spearmint and oregano) and assorted veggies (cabbage, carrots, eggplant and leeks) and fruit (strawberries, watermelon). As Garden Club volunteer Yolanda Cirulli told The New York Times in a 2011 interview, “Not only does this library feed the mind, but it also feeds the body.”
Gary Makufka, a staff member at the library, says that at the end of the summer, “we invite the public to take home a little of each” crop. Last summer, however, “the weather was not cooperative so we didn’t have much of anything.” He adds, “But there’s always next year.”
Hope, like garlic, springs eternal.

File under: Things I didn’t know about the Bronx, Garden clubs and libraries are wonderful. ~AR

bronxhipster:

The City Island Branch Library has the distinction of being the very first public library to serve the outer boroughs. The library, which is currently located between Bay and Fordham Streets, was established in 1911— the same year as the main branch on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street.

On the outside, the building is somewhat evocative of a tugboat — portholes and all. On the inside, you’ll find the largest collection of maritime fiction and non-fiction books in New York City. The more than 1,000 tomes comprising the collection cover a variety of nautical topics, including the America’s Cup, boat construction, lighthouses, naval history, pirates, and shipwrecks.

When the library was enlarged and renovated In 1997, a patio was added in the backyard. For the past five years the Garden Club of City Island has used part of the backyard for a public garden, which it helps the library staff ftend and water. The productive little plot yields salad fixings (lettuce and cherry tomatoes), herbs (basil, spearmint and oregano) and assorted veggies (cabbage, carrots, eggplant and leeks) and fruit (strawberries, watermelon). As Garden Club volunteer Yolanda Cirulli told The New York Times in a 2011 interview, “Not only does this library feed the mind, but it also feeds the body.”

Gary Makufka, a staff member at the library, says that at the end of the summer, “we invite the public to take home a little of each” crop. Last summer, however, “the weather was not cooperative so we didn’t have much of anything.” He adds, “But there’s always next year.”

Hope, like garlic, springs eternal.

File under: Things I didn’t know about the Bronx, Garden clubs and libraries are wonderful. ~AR

December 11, 2013
Thank you Conde Nast Traveler for including us in this great slideshow illustrating why you should visit a botanical garden this winter! If you can’t make it to New York City this holiday season, there are beautiful options included in Washington, D.C., Phoenix, Denver, Atlanta, Pennsylvania, London (in the U.K.), and two in Canada.
(via This Is Why You Should Visit Botanical Gardens in the Winter : Condé Nast Traveler)

Thank you Conde Nast Traveler for including us in this great slideshow illustrating why you should visit a botanical garden this winter! If you can’t make it to New York City this holiday season, there are beautiful options included in Washington, D.C., Phoenix, Denver, Atlanta, Pennsylvania, London (in the U.K.), and two in Canada.

(via This Is Why You Should Visit Botanical Gardens in the Winter : Condé Nast Traveler)

December 10, 2013

The first snow in the Garden is something we have to share. It turns the world black and white, in the very best possible sense. The Garden goes quiet and soft, and even though it’s a bit cold, it feels somehow warm and comfortable. Magic. ~AR

Photos by NYBG photographer Ivo M. Vermeulen.

December 7, 2013
sci-universe:

 The most photographed sightseeing spots in the world.
Sightsmap is an interactive heatmap made by Estonian computer science professor Tanel Tammet. It is powered by data from Panoramio, a location-based photo sharing site.

Happy to be part of that yellow blob on the northeast coast of the United States! ~AR

sci-universe:

The most photographed sightseeing spots in the world.

Sightsmap is an interactive heatmap made by Estonian computer science professor Tanel Tammet. It is powered by data from Panoramio, a location-based photo sharing site.

Happy to be part of that yellow blob on the northeast coast of the United States! ~AR

December 6, 2013
klnwhooha:

I’ve struck autumnal gold at the NYBG! :D 

Nature’s first green is gold,  Her hardest hue to hold.  Her early leafs a flower;  But only so an hour.  Then leaf subsides to leaf.  So Eden sank to grief,  So dawn goes down to day.  Nothing gold can stay.
~ Robert Frost - Nothing Gold Can Stay

klnwhooha:

I’ve struck autumnal gold at the NYBG! :D 

Nature’s first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leafs a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.

~ Robert Frost - Nothing Gold Can Stay

December 5, 2013

What’s beautiful now? The end of leaves.

The leaves are mostly off the trees these days, which means they’re gathering on the grass, amongst the trees, or in the Bronx River. The absence of leaves gives the opportunity to enjoy the architecture of the Garden; to marvel at enormous trees and tiny seed pods. Increased leaf litter makes it easier to spot the birds and animals that make their homes in the Garden.

So, when you visit, yes, you do have to visit the Holiday Train Show, but also be sure to take a turn through the Forest and a stroll through the Ornamental Conifers. Look carefully, listen closely, and see our grounds with new eyes!

For a look at what’s going on today at the Garden, follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post updates from our staff and visitors. Need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store. ~AR

Photos by NYBG photographer Ivo M. Vermeulen.

December 2, 2013

When trains run over wet leaves, “it actually creates a slurry,” said John Kesich, a vice president at Metro-North.

Has your train been running a little more pokily than usual? Blame the leaves. Leaves contain pectin, the same stuff that makes your jelly gel, and when they’re crushed under heavy trains, things get a bit slippy. This is an interesting little piece on an element of public transportation I never thought about before. Sometimes it amazes me that our mass transit systems work as well as they do. ~AR
(via New York Today: Beware of Leaves - NYTimes.com)

When trains run over wet leaves, “it actually creates a slurry,” said John Kesich, a vice president at Metro-North.

Has your train been running a little more pokily than usual? Blame the leaves. Leaves contain pectin, the same stuff that makes your jelly gel, and when they’re crushed under heavy trains, things get a bit slippy. This is an interesting little piece on an element of public transportation I never thought about before. Sometimes it amazes me that our mass transit systems work as well as they do. ~AR

(via New York Today: Beware of Leaves - NYTimes.com)

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