December 21, 2013

booksandframes:

The New York Botanical Garden has so many beautiful trails to walk through, you cannot fully go through the whole place in one day. The place is so insanely serene and manicured. You can even catch a glimpse of a waterfall there. 

NYBGIFS! YES! MORE PLEASE!

November 11, 2013

I found this little book at a used book/gift store while visiting family upstate a few weekends ago. It was one in a series of guidebooks focused on plants and birds sitting in a bin, and the only one written by an NYBG staffer, T.H. Everett.

Everett was a world renowned horticulturist, writer, and educator. His influence within this realm is magnified by the number of his students and colleagues who went on to have influential careers in their own right. At NYBG, the beautiful Rock Garden, which was designed and implemented under Everett’s watchful eye, is named in his honor. Everett is also associated with two of the New York-area’s other great gardens, the beautifully renovated Wave Hill, which he helped lobby to save, and the currently under renovation Untermeyer Gardens, where he held his first horticulture position in the United States.

These pages are just a fraction of the 50 or so in this slim book, perfectly sized for carrying in one’s pocket. What fascinates me is how many of these plants were already in danger of disappearing in 1945 (yes I did the math to convert MCMXLV to Arabic numerals. Thank you liberal arts degree!). While you can find many of them in our newly reopened Native Plant Garden, I am afraid some of them are exceedingly rare at this time, a state of affairs that would probably just have spurred Everett to further action! ~AR

October 13, 2013
dennis-k:

Botanical Garden, Copenhagen

We get many people asking why we paint the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory white for the summer. White is reflective, it keeps the building from becoming too hot, thus saving the plants from baking and scorching. Apparently in Copenhagen they do the same thing, but with billowing white drapes. Pretty, no? ~AR

dennis-k:

Botanical Garden, Copenhagen

We get many people asking why we paint the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory white for the summer. White is reflective, it keeps the building from becoming too hot, thus saving the plants from baking and scorching. Apparently in Copenhagen they do the same thing, but with billowing white drapes. Pretty, no? ~AR

October 6, 2013

rhesastorms:

Once again, a magical weekend at the New York Botanical Garden!

The Haunted Pumpkin Garden is good like that. ~AR

October 4, 2013

What’s beautiful now? Kiku! What’s kiku you ask? It is the Japanese word for chrysanthemum, but it is also the name of a horticultural artform similar to bonsai, kind of. Where bonsai is small, kiku is large. Where bonsai is minimalist, kiku is maximalist. Each floral sculpture starts as one wee stem that is then pruned and prodded to take on complex forms over 11 months. And then they go on display for less than a month during Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory. And then we start all over again. Kiku opens Saturday and runs through October 27.

For day-to-day updates on what we’re seeing around grounds, be sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post daily updates from our staff and visitors. Need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store.

Photos by NYBG photographer Ivo M. Vermeulen.

September 27, 2013

parnassiandreams:

The Bronx Botanical Gardens.

Those blue poppies (Meconopsis grandis, aka the Himalayan blue poppy) get me every time. ~AR

August 20, 2013
There’s no story for me to add here. The colors and contrasts just get me. —MN

There’s no story for me to add here. The colors and contrasts just get me. —MN

(Source: mybot)

May 8, 2013

cindykrikawa:

Tulips & Pansies at the New York Botanical Garden, NYC.

Yup, yup, yup. Uh-huh. This. —MN

March 29, 2013

So dashing, so handsome, so…well, not exactly beaming with mirthful enthusiasm, was he? His partner, meanwhile, was simply too busy for this camera nonsense.

Nathaniel Lord Britton may not have been the smiliest gentleman to sit for a photo op (I’m pretty sure the thousand-yard stare was a requisite back then), but his stern looks belied a boundless joy for botany—an enthusiasm matched only by that of his bryologist wife, Elizabeth Britton (studious to the nth degree), which would ultimately lay the groundwork for The New York Botanical Garden.

The erudite duo met as members of the famed Torrey Botanical Club (now Society) in the 1880s, but it wasn’t until after visiting Britain’s Kew Gardens on their honeymoon that Elizabeth made her pitch to the Club here in the U.S.: New York deserved its own botanical garden, and the Brittons were more than willing to take the reins. By 1895, only seven years after Elizabeth’s proposal, Nathaniel had left his position with Columbia University to take on the newly-established NYBG in the Bronx as its full-time Director—a title he would hold until 1929.

Over the course of almost 50 years, the pair’s lasting relationship produced some of the finest botanical work this country has ever seen, covering the publication of numerous landmark texts, the promotion of new botanical nomenclatures, and—of course—the establishment of North America’s foremost botanical garden.

It’s said that Elizabeth’s death in 1934, being such a blow to Nathaniel, contributed to his own death only four months later. I suppose “the couple that gardens together, stays together” is almost an apt aphorism in this case.

Special thanks goes out to the tack-sharp Mia D’Avanza, our Reference Librarian, for coming up with these images via the Mertz Archives. The top left image is, in fact, Nathaniel as a toddler, wearing a unisex dress of the period. —MN

March 9, 2013

The perspective of that first image just gets me in the best way. The Orchid Show runs through April 22. —MN

cindykrikawa:

Orchids & Company at the New York Botanical Garden, NYC.

March 21, 2012
bewilderbeastie:

American Robins by donsutherland1 on Flickr.

"A robin redbreast in a cage Puts all heaven in a rage.”
- William Blake
Not that we cage our robins here at the NYBG. In winter, you’ll find them bursting en masse from Japanese beautyberry bushes at the approach of passersby, or pecking in patches of compost or mulch in early spring.
At the very least, they’re kinder on the eye than starlings or grackles. But that’s just my opinion. —MN

bewilderbeastie:

American Robins by donsutherland1 on Flickr.

"A robin redbreast in a cage
 Puts all heaven in a rage.”

- William Blake

Not that we cage our robins here at the NYBG. In winter, you’ll find them bursting en masse from Japanese beautyberry bushes at the approach of passersby, or pecking in patches of compost or mulch in early spring.

At the very least, they’re kinder on the eye than starlings or grackles. But that’s just my opinion. —MN

(via bewilderbeastie-deactivated2012)

July 20, 2011

New York Works | A Brooklyn Arborist

Did you hear this story on WNYC this morning and wonder how you can learn more about proper tree care in your own yard? The New York Botanical Garden's Adult Education department teaches many classes on this topic, including Tree Climbing (though no classes will be held until next year), Pruning Basics, and Tree Identification.

July 19, 2011
Hawk Bath

Even the Garden’s resident red-tailed hawks are looking for ways to beat the heat. Lucky for them, they’re not restricted from using the Garden’s fountains as a way to cool off a bit.

Hawk contemplating a dip in the Fountain of Life

Hawk contemplates taking a dip in the Fountain of Life

Hawk hops into the Fountain of Life at NYBG

Yeah, I think a cooling dip sounds like a great idea!

Red-tail hawk midway through a hot day's bath in the Fountain of Life

Oh! Sweet! Relief!

Hawk, post-bath

So much better!

Huge thanks to Paul Silverman from the LuEsther T. Mertz Library for sending in these amazing photos!

July 17, 2011

Great interview with Toby Adams, manager of the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, on the Bronx Journal’s video series.

July 17, 2011
Another “reject” from Plant Talk’s Summer Color Week. Let’s end Color Week with the anti-color: White!
Sprinklers. Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

Another “reject” from Plant Talk’s Summer Color Week. Let’s end Color Week with the anti-color: White!

Sprinklers. Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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