January 22, 2014
anitramm:

Christopher Dresser, Botanical lecture diagram, ca. 1855, V&A

Dresser was an influential industrial designer and important member of the Aesthetic Movement. He also had an extensive background in botany, as evidenced by the designs above. Some of his designs are still in production through the firm Alessi. ~AR

anitramm:

Christopher Dresser, Botanical lecture diagram, ca. 1855, V&A

Dresser was an influential industrial designer and important member of the Aesthetic Movement. He also had an extensive background in botany, as evidenced by the designs above. Some of his designs are still in production through the firm Alessi. ~AR

December 16, 2013

fastcodesign:

Onformative Transforms Facebook Data Into Gorgeous Wallpaper

"On the one hand we were interested in the contrast of nostalgic handmade drawings representing today’s digital communication. On the other hand those drawings are incredibly detailed, offering the possibility to weave data into little nuances."

More> Co.Design

And they were inspired by 19th-century botanical illustrations, something I guessed at first glance. Data is beauty, beauty is data. ~AR

(via fastcompany)

October 5, 2013

dontstopmotion:

Four Seasons

Because if you’re not following Rachel Ryle on Instagram, you’re really missing out. Not all of her meticulous, hand-drawn stop motion animations are botanical based, but they are all amazing.

Another botanically-inspired Instagrammer of note is Khiesti who makes wonderful little illustrations based around leaves, flowers, and seeds. Since she is based in Germany, Kerstin’s wonderful drawings tend to be posted overnight (for those of us based on the East Coast in the U.S.) and provide a wonderful pick me up in the morning. ~AR

September 15, 2013

staceythinx:

Jung - Koch - Quentell ‘sche [Neue] Wandtafeln [1900-1970?]

It’s Sunday, meaning these artful botanical illustrations can tickle your creative tastes while still offering enough red-spectrum motivation to pique your appetite for a Bloody Mary. —MN

(via botanicalperversion)

June 3, 2013

icarusglass:

my newest animation for class!

The botany-inspired art that can be found on Tumblr is so frequently surprising and charming, just like this little stop motion drawing of bleeding hearts. ~AR

(Source: wormyorchids)

May 23, 2013

huntingtonlibrary:

William Sharp, one of the first chromolithographic printers in the U.S., created these extraordinary illustrations for the large folio Victoria Regia (1854) by John Fisk Allen. Allen, a well-known horticulturalist, cultivated a specimen of the rare, huge (up to 8 feet in diameter), fast-growing (up to an inch an hour!) water lily, native to the Amazon. After months of careful tending, the plant—named in honor of the recently-crowned Queen Victoria—blossomed on the evening of July 21, 1853. Sharp’s depictions of this exotic wonder—in various stages of bloom—were masterpieces and elevated the then-nascent art of chromolithography to spectacular new heights.

image captions: All images are from a copy of Victoria Regia in our collections. Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

May 21, 2013
amnhnyc:

It’s Tuesday’s peek into the archives!
A botanical sketch used in creating the Grant caribou diorama in the Hall of North American Mammals, which first opened in 1942. 
Pictured: Buck brush and fire weed
(c) AMNH Library

Buckbrush is a plant in the genus Ceanothusthat is native to the United States and commonly eaten by deer. Fireweed is Chamerion angustifolium, and can be found around the world north of the Equator. ~AR

amnhnyc:

It’s Tuesday’s peek into the archives!

A botanical sketch used in creating the Grant caribou diorama in the Hall of North American Mammals, which first opened in 1942. 

Pictured: Buck brush and fire weed

(c) AMNH Library

Buckbrush is a plant in the genus Ceanothusthat is native to the United States and commonly eaten by deer. Fireweed is Chamerion angustifolium, and can be found around the world north of the Equator. ~AR

March 12, 2013

Given their propensity for mulberry leaves, I am assuming that the moths and caterpillars in this illustration are silk worms. Any entymologists out there that can confirm this? ~AR

Thegetty:

Maria Sibylla Merian and her daughters were pioneers of natural history illustration and entomology. Among other achievements, at age 52 Maria Sibylla she sold most of her belongings and set sail for the Dutch colony of Suriname. That was in 1699.

Mulberries, caterpillars, and moths, Maria Sibylla Merian, in De Europische insecten (European Insects), 1730. The Getty Research Institute

October 2, 2011
Another beautiful drawing by New York-area artist Greg Betza. Here are some of Greg’s previous Garden “doodles.”
At the Orchid Show
Summer Flowers
June Watercolor

Another beautiful drawing by New York-area artist Greg Betza. Here are some of Greg’s previous Garden “doodles.”

At the Orchid Show

Summer Flowers

June Watercolor

September 17, 2011
We love, love, love the beautiful watercolors that New York-area artist Greg Betza paints here at the Garden. This one looks like it might be from the Perennial Garden or the Seasonal Walk.

We love, love, love the beautiful watercolors that New York-area artist Greg Betza paints here at the Garden. This one looks like it might be from the Perennial Garden or the Seasonal Walk.

May 17, 2011
From the Library: Agaricus contortus

As illustrated in Herbier de la France by Pierre Bulliard.

These digitized volumes were added by The New York Botanical Garden's LuEsther T. Mertz Library to the Biodiversity Heritage Library. The Mertz Library is a contributing member to the BHL consortium.

April 20, 2011
First Glance: ‘Green Currency: Plants in the Economy’

Green Currency: Plants in the Economy—an exhibition of botanical art at The New York Botanical Garden which opens to the public today—offers the rare chance to look through a wide array of beautifully hand-drawn or hand-painted illustrations of plants. Each plant has been chosen for its economic value and importance in our everyday lives.

Heirloom Tomato, 'Solanum lycopersicum' © 2009 Asuka Hishiki, watercolor on paper

Heirloom Tomato, Solanum lycopersicum © 2009 Asuka Hishiki, watercolor on paper

March 17, 2011
Garden Design has a fascinating interview with botanical font-illustrator Sasha Prood.

Garden Design has a fascinating interview with botanical font-illustrator Sasha Prood.

January 28, 2011
Botanical illustrations: A unique blend of art and science

December 30, 2010
Vintage Posters

Fiona Richards is the graphic designer behind Cartolina stationary. On her blog, Cafe Cartolina, she frequently writes about the places she finds inspiration for her gorgeous cards. This is frequently found in vintage posters. After drooling over several of her finds, we just had to share a few of our botanical-inspired favorites.

If you’re inspired to try your own hand at botanical illustrations of this sort, consider taking a class at the Garden.

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