June 26, 2014

marisarenee:

Spring Snowfall
Original photographs and animated .gif set by Marisa Renee

For when your current lack of central A/C has you wondering why you ever complained about flurries in March. —MN

June 25, 2014

theeternalnewb said: I loved that post about the bitters. I'm partway through memorizing The Drunken Botanist at this point simply due to how FASCINATING this all is.

So good! We actually had Amy Stewart speaking here a couple of weeks ago. She was taking part in our Weird, Wild, & Wonderful botanical discussion and booksigning alongside Elizabeth Gilbert. And she just so happened to supply a couple of the recipes we used for the evening’s cocktail bar.

I find even those least inclined to enjoy botany can at least appreciate the fact that all of our nightcaps come from some sort of plant. “They give us oxygen and alcohol” is a good open and shut response to anyone rolling eyes at the study of vegetation. —MN

P.S. – If any of you out there haven’t picked up The Drunken Botanist, it comes highly recommended from all corners of the plant world.

June 24, 2014

oakapples:

Great Yellow Gentian, Gentiana lutea. Lots of uses- most importantly, for Angostura bitters.

As is the way with just about any alcoholic product over a century old (yes, I’m generalizing, stay your Tumblr swords), it’s said that you can count on one hand the number of people who know the exact recipe for Angostura bitters. But actual angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata) isn’t—nor has it ever been—one of the ingredients.

Gentiana lutea is indeed one of them, however, owing to its amarogentin content. This glycoside is one of the most bitter substances known, so it figures we’d challenge ourselves by plugging it into our favorite cocktail flavoring. —MN

June 20, 2014
aeromachia:

sergeantprnz:

WHO NAMED THIS FLOWER

IT BARGES INTO ALL YOUR CONVERSATIONS
IT GIVES YOU A STUPID NICKNAME WHEN YOU’VE MET, LIKE, ONCE
IT WIGGLES ITS STAMENS AT YOU SUGGESTIVELY FOR NO REASON
IT IS: THE AGGRESSIVELY FORWARD BEARDED IRIS

Plants bring such joy into people’s lives - by which I mean you’ll laugh at your desk to the point of actual tears.
(BTW, just to chime in and be a plant nerd: the Latin name is Iris germanica ‘Aggressively Forward’) ~LM

aeromachia:

sergeantprnz:

WHO NAMED THIS FLOWER

IT BARGES INTO ALL YOUR CONVERSATIONS

IT GIVES YOU A STUPID NICKNAME WHEN YOU’VE MET, LIKE, ONCE

IT WIGGLES ITS STAMENS AT YOU SUGGESTIVELY FOR NO REASON

IT IS: THE AGGRESSIVELY FORWARD BEARDED IRIS

Plants bring such joy into people’s lives - by which I mean you’ll laugh at your desk to the point of actual tears.

(BTW, just to chime in and be a plant nerd: the Latin name is Iris germanica ‘Aggressively Forward’) ~LM

(Source: )

June 20, 2014

chrysanthemumble said: Does the NYBG have a library? I'm a beginning library science student and my dream job/internship would be at a botanical garden library!

Of course! The LuEsther T. Mertz Library is one of the foremost plant research libraries in the country, with an unparalleled rare book collection, and the William and Lynda Steere Herbarium is one of the largest collections of plant specimens in the world. Today just happens to mark the inaugural symposium of the Library’s new Humanities Institute, which will begin sponsoring fellowships in 2015. Perhaps one will be you!

June 19, 2014
"Her friends, local foragers and their partners, arrive, and Viljoen immediately serves deviled eggs with field garlic, and what she half-jokingly calls “weed bruschetta,” toasted homemade sourdough bread topped with sautéed and bitter tasting nettle, dock and field garlic greens. The discussion ranges across many topics, including the large amount of mushrooms Gary Lincoff, a local mycologist and minor celebrity in foraging circles, identified this spring."

NYC Is Your Salad Bar: A Day In The Life Of An Urban Forager: Gothamist

Ha! Our own NYBG Adult Ed Instructor Gary Lincoff got a shout-out in this terrific Gothamist piece as a “celebrity in foraging circles” (I won’t tell him, lest he get a swelled head).

Regan Penaluna’s profile on Marie Viljoen’s urban foraging practice is well worth a read. If you want to learn more before dodging park rangers to pick your next salad, check out our own conversation with another NYBG Instructor, Leda Meredith~LM

June 18, 2014
(via In Nature | The Gardener of Versailles)

André Le Nôtre’s 17th-century masterpiece for Louis XIV has not been altered for centuries — until now. The renowned yet humble French landscape designer Louis Benech is reimagining the four-acre Water Theater, the Sun King’s favorite grove.

An amazing project, I love seeing what a talented landscape designer can do to bring new life into a historic estate. ~LM

(via In Nature | The Gardener of Versailles)

André Le Nôtre’s 17th-century masterpiece for Louis XIV has not been altered for centuries — until now. The renowned yet humble French landscape designer Louis Benech is reimagining the four-acre Water Theater, the Sun King’s favorite grove.

An amazing project, I love seeing what a talented landscape designer can do to bring new life into a historic estate. ~LM

June 17, 2014
annstreetstudio:

Must you sing of days gone byMust you always sigh Tell me why your song is sad, never glad Blue River, Blue River Do you hold the memory Of a vanished dream
Words he sang while they danced away.

I’m blown away by the outfits that were on display at last weekend’s first Jazz Age Lawn Party on Governors Island, and Michael Arenella & His Dreamland Orchestra may have been the sharpest dressers among them. I am counting down the days until he brings the party to the Garden for the first of our Jazz Age Evenings on June 26. Break out your best vintage duds and dance the night away to celebrate the world of Groundbreakers this summer at NYBG! I need to get new cufflinks. ~LM

annstreetstudio:

Must you sing of days gone by
Must you always sigh
Tell me why your song is sad, never glad
Blue River, Blue River
Do you hold the memory Of a vanished dream


Words he sang while they danced away.

I’m blown away by the outfits that were on display at last weekend’s first Jazz Age Lawn Party on Governors Island, and Michael Arenella & His Dreamland Orchestra may have been the sharpest dressers among them. I am counting down the days until he brings the party to the Garden for the first of our Jazz Age Evenings on June 26. Break out your best vintage duds and dance the night away to celebrate the world of Groundbreakers this summer at NYBG! I need to get new cufflinks. ~LM

June 13, 2014
whatyousowblog:

Elderflower ice cubes. A nice one to try for #worldginday tomorrow.

Common flavoring elements in gin go beyond the core component of juniper berries to include everything from licorice and anise, to citrus rinds, coriander, almonds, saffron, frankincense, and any number of other possible botanical bits. It’s already a garden in a bottle, so you might as well go full plant nursery with the elderflower. —MN

whatyousowblog:

Elderflower ice cubes. A nice one to try for #worldginday tomorrow.

Common flavoring elements in gin go beyond the core component of juniper berries to include everything from licorice and anise, to citrus rinds, coriander, almonds, saffron, frankincense, and any number of other possible botanical bits. It’s already a garden in a bottle, so you might as well go full plant nursery with the elderflower. —MN

June 12, 2014
In the words of William Blake, “A robin redbreast on a post…uh…is an ideal Garden host.”
I’m paraphrasing. —MN

In the words of William Blake, “A robin redbreast on a post…uh…is an ideal Garden host.”

I’m paraphrasing. —MN

June 11, 2014

ichthyologist:

Sundew Catapults Prey into Trap

Drosera glanduligera is a species of sundew, a group of carnivorous plants that use sticky tentacles to ensnare their prey. This is species is unique in that it has extremely fast ‘snap tentacles’ which literally fling their prey into their sticky traps.

Sundews have evolved the ability to digest insects as an adaptation to their nutrient poor habitats. Once a prey is caught in the glue-like secretions, it either dies from exhaustion or asphyxiates from being smothered in dew. The plant then secretes enzymes which break down the insect, allowing the plant to absorb its nutrients.

All species of sundew are able to move their inner tentacles to pass prey towards the center of the leaf, where digestion is most efficient. Many species are able to fold the surface of the leaf around the prey to ensure contact with a larger digestive surface.

Drosera glanduligera is the fastest moving sundew, with ‘snap tentacles’ which fold inwards within 75 milliseconds. This action is triggered when an insect makes contact with them, and are powerful enough to catapult the insect into the center of the leaf, where it becomes glued down. 

Gif from video: Poppinga, S. Et al. via Wikimedia Commons

I know that we keep many of our Conservatory’s carnivorous plants behind glass primarily for environmental reasons—they have specific humidity requirements. But it’s also because I would be out there feeding them flies all day if not for that barrier to entry. —MN

June 9, 2014

It’s a bit rainy today, and by “a bit” I mean “I canoed to work,” so we’re gonna do a little time traveling back to the sunny days of yore—or rather last Friday. The weather’s been hitting that sweet spot between spring and summer of late; we plan to see more of it going forward!

We’re throwing our Big Backyard BBQ this coming weekend (in the sunshine, I’m sure), June 14 and 15, so check it out if you’re in the area. It’s going to be all about food, craft beer, and music like crazy. —MN

June 5, 2014

nevver:

Through the woods, darkly - Peter Guenzel

If you can’t suss out a woodland’s native mysticism—and believe me, it’s there—add your own. Then promptly pretend you are fleeing a hungry gang of R.O.U.S.es. —MN

June 4, 2014
Rosa 'Harison's Yellow' in the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden (currently at 21% of peak color!). This sunny hybrid is a real New Yorker, having been bred by its namesake, attorney George Folliott Harison, at his home in Manhattan way back in the 1830s! Like so many Americans, this rose struck out West, brought by settlers until it began to grow wild and gain a second name as the Oregon Trail Rose.
Species names often carry a rich history, and roses have historically attracted the attention of skilled hybridizers who live on in their stunning cultivars, even centuries later.
You can expect a couple more rosarian shout-outs this week in the lead up to our Rose Garden Celebration. ~LM
(via » Plant Talk | NYBG)

Rosa 'Harison's Yellow' in the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden (currently at 21% of peak color!). This sunny hybrid is a real New Yorker, having been bred by its namesake, attorney George Folliott Harison, at his home in Manhattan way back in the 1830s! Like so many Americans, this rose struck out West, brought by settlers until it began to grow wild and gain a second name as the Oregon Trail Rose.

Species names often carry a rich history, and roses have historically attracted the attention of skilled hybridizers who live on in their stunning cultivars, even centuries later.

You can expect a couple more rosarian shout-outs this week in the lead up to our Rose Garden Celebration. ~LM

(via » Plant Talk | NYBG)

June 2, 2014
ariellekilljoy:

drawing roses for work.
micron pen on watercolor paper

Hint, hint. Our Rose Garden Celebration is this weekend, June 7 and 8 (and I’m pretty sure this art is tied to one of our visiting vendors?). I mean, if you like wearing garden party hats the size of kiddie pools and hanging out in the spring vibrance, snacking on eats from gourmet vendors and listening to some chill jazz, you could certainly do worse. —MN

ariellekilljoy:

drawing roses for work.

micron pen on watercolor paper

Hint, hint. Our Rose Garden Celebration is this weekend, June 7 and 8 (and I’m pretty sure this art is tied to one of our visiting vendors?). I mean, if you like wearing garden party hats the size of kiddie pools and hanging out in the spring vibrance, snacking on eats from gourmet vendors and listening to some chill jazz, you could certainly do worse. —MN

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