July 29, 2014
I was just struck with the realization that I still haven’t had candy cap mushrooms (Lactarius rubidus). After reblogging a mushroom tattoo post from way back, the person highlighted in the story—Susie—got in touch with us to provide the recipe for the cookies that were mentioned. Yes, cookies made with mushrooms (that are completely innocuous and will not make you see the future).
I’ve since lost the recipe she sent me, as well as the message itself, which has caused me no end of heartbreak; Susie is awesome. But I did find a recipe here that seems pretty similar. Someday, little candy cap. Someday. —MN
(Photo Credit: Fat of the Land)

I was just struck with the realization that I still haven’t had candy cap mushrooms (Lactarius rubidus). After reblogging a mushroom tattoo post from way back, the person highlighted in the story—Susie—got in touch with us to provide the recipe for the cookies that were mentioned. Yes, cookies made with mushrooms (that are completely innocuous and will not make you see the future).

I’ve since lost the recipe she sent me, as well as the message itself, which has caused me no end of heartbreak; Susie is awesome. But I did find a recipe here that seems pretty similar. Someday, little candy cap. Someday. —MN

(Photo Credit: Fat of the Land)

July 24, 2014
Brave New Gardening for Brave New Climates

“Awareness is changing in a way that is here to stay,” said Brian Sullivan, a vice president for landscapes at The New York Botanical Garden. “Yard by yard, region by region, the overall environmental impact of this trend, which I think is very positive, is substantial.”

With drought a very real threat for much of the country, and indeed the world, that classic English lawn is looking decidedly less appetizing, no matter how easy it is on the eyes. Water bills and fertilizing issues only exacerbate the problem. That said, ripping out your entire lawn and replacing it with hardy local plants and vegetables is quickly becoming a more reasonable option than the average H.O.A. is willing to admit.
Head through for a nifty article on the growing popularity (and environmental boon) of conscientious lawns, from using hardier grass cultivars to full on xeriscaping. —MN
Photo credit: Michael Savageau/Associated Press

Brave New Gardening for Brave New Climates

“Awareness is changing in a way that is here to stay,” said Brian Sullivan, a vice president for landscapes at The New York Botanical Garden. “Yard by yard, region by region, the overall environmental impact of this trend, which I think is very positive, is substantial.”

With drought a very real threat for much of the country, and indeed the world, that classic English lawn is looking decidedly less appetizing, no matter how easy it is on the eyes. Water bills and fertilizing issues only exacerbate the problem. That said, ripping out your entire lawn and replacing it with hardy local plants and vegetables is quickly becoming a more reasonable option than the average H.O.A. is willing to admit.

Head through for a nifty article on the growing popularity (and environmental boon) of conscientious lawns, from using hardier grass cultivars to full on xeriscaping. —MN

Photo credit: Michael Savageau/Associated Press

July 22, 2014
czechthecount:

Palm Trees

I thought to myself, “I’ve got this great article on region-appropriate native landscaping that I should share on Tumblr!” But then I thought, “It’s only Tuesday. Coconut palms are the heroes the readers need.”
Tomorrow: inspiration for alternative lawns in a time of environmental uncertainty. Today: cubicle escapism. —MN

czechthecount:

Palm Trees

I thought to myself, “I’ve got this great article on region-appropriate native landscaping that I should share on Tumblr!” But then I thought, “It’s only Tuesday. Coconut palms are the heroes the readers need.”

Tomorrow: inspiration for alternative lawns in a time of environmental uncertainty. Today: cubicle escapism. —MN

July 21, 2014

fastcodesign:

On Tuesday, a bonsai tree boldly went where no bonsai tree has gone before.

Azuma Makoto, a 38-year-old artist based in Tokyo, launched two botanical arrangements into orbit: “Shiki 1,” a Japanese white pine bonsai tree suspended from a metal frame, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, lilies, hydrangeas, and irises.

Read More>

Pair this with that time Anamanaguchi sent a slice of pizza into space and the past couple of years have been good for orbital art. After being launched from the site of Burning Man in Nevada, the botanical rigs traveled to about 90,000 feet before descending back to Earth, where they were found around five miles from the launch site. —MN

Have the various space agencies ever left plants suspended in the vacuum for extended periods of time, and if so, any ideas of the physical impact on the remains?

(via fastcompany)

July 18, 2014

mentalflossr:

Four Floral Posters Featuring 200 Flowers

This weekend, make an arrangement of something. A cut flower arrangement for your dining room table; a doodle of all the backyard bugs you can see in an hour; a Things Organized Neatly-style selection of the things in your hiking pack; a garden row of soon-to-be-edible seedlings. Set aside some time to make a thing. —MN

July 17, 2014
My kingdom for a clip of Zsa Zsa Gabor saying “Daaaaaahlia.”

My kingdom for a clip of Zsa Zsa Gabor saying “Daaaaaahlia.”

(Source: theonetrueself, via chronicsci)

July 15, 2014

tastefullyoffensive:

Men With Fabulous Flower Beards [boredpanda]

Photos by Pierce Thiot

Flower Beards are the latest invasive species identified by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. These rapidly spreading weeds choke the native ecosystem, decimate the pollinator population, and cause massive irritation. Please ask your local barber or nursery for further tips on curbing the spread of Flower Beards. This has been a Public Service Announcement from NYBG. ~LM

July 11, 2014

nevver:

Clare Celeste Börsch

It’s Friday. Tell your boss you’re tandem waterskiing off into the sunset, leaving a wake of flower petals and geodes. —MN

(Source: clareceleste.com)

July 8, 2014

The hottest time of year is made a bit cooler by the lotus and water lily blossoms in our reflecting pools. Here are some gorgeous shots of Nelumbo nucifera (or sacred lotus) and Nymphaea ‘Clyde Ikins’, a water lily—before you check the captions, can you tell which is which? ~LM

July 3, 2014
It’s not really summer ‘til the Nymphaea flowers pop up. Way up. You’ll find the likes of ‘Denver’ (this one right here), ‘Clyde Ikins’, and ‘Moon Dance’ water lily cultivars poking their heads above the waterline in our Conservatory pools, with more to follow in a flurry of whites, yellows, purples, and pinks.
This means the lotus can’t be far behind. —MN

It’s not really summer ‘til the Nymphaea flowers pop up. Way up. You’ll find the likes of ‘Denver’ (this one right here), ‘Clyde Ikins’, and ‘Moon Dance’ water lily cultivars poking their heads above the waterline in our Conservatory pools, with more to follow in a flurry of whites, yellows, purples, and pinks.

This means the lotus can’t be far behind. —MN

July 1, 2014
christopher-genner:

Chris Genner - Meadow 

Just a good palette. —MN

christopher-genner:

Chris Genner - Meadow 

Just a good palette. —MN

June 29, 2014

"Every year, we try and improve our cultivars. When I started, we would have four or five days of really good courts. We’re now getting to maybe day 10 or 11, so we’re almost grabbing an extra week. Ultimately we would like to get through the whole fortnight that way, but whether that’s possible I don’t know. You find that the grass technology improves but the players are getting bigger and stronger so it kind of balances.

While the World Cup is all anybody is talking about, another beloved athletic championship is also underway: Wimbledon. The Telegraph has an interesting interview with the head groundsman, Neil Stubley, who occupies just one of the many fascinating but lesser-known horticultural professions. Any professional sport that requires turf has a similar specialist. A life in the world of plants can take you some unexpected places. ~LM
(via Wimbledon 2013: how to serve up a perfect grass court - Telegraph)

"Every year, we try and improve our cultivars. When I started, we would have four or five days of really good courts. We’re now getting to maybe day 10 or 11, so we’re almost grabbing an extra week. Ultimately we would like to get through the whole fortnight that way, but whether that’s possible I don’t know. You find that the grass technology improves but the players are getting bigger and stronger so it kind of balances.

While the World Cup is all anybody is talking about, another beloved athletic championship is also underway: Wimbledon. The Telegraph has an interesting interview with the head groundsman, Neil Stubley, who occupies just one of the many fascinating but lesser-known horticultural professions. Any professional sport that requires turf has a similar specialist. A life in the world of plants can take you some unexpected places. ~LM

(via Wimbledon 2013: how to serve up a perfect grass court - Telegraph)

June 28, 2014
nycdesignarchive:

New York Botanical Garden lakeside shelter, architects Brinley & Holbrook, series 392, exhibit C, approved March 9, 1909. 

Wow! Signed by Nathaniel Lord Britton himself, NYBG’s first Director. ~LM

nycdesignarchive:

New York Botanical Garden lakeside shelter, architects Brinley & Holbrook, series 392, exhibit C, approved March 9, 1909. 

Wow! Signed by Nathaniel Lord Britton himself, NYBG’s first Director. ~LM

June 27, 2014
(via Photos: Inside The Abandoned Boyce Thompson Institute : Gothamist)
There’s something especially beautiful and eerie (if not slightly depressing) about abandoned greenhouses. This slice of botanical history in nearby Yonkers, NY is an interesting read with some arresting images. Of course, it makes me grateful that we take such scrupulous care of our historic structures here at NYBG, and of course our own Conservatory is aging much more gracefully. ~LM

(via Photos: Inside The Abandoned Boyce Thompson Institute : Gothamist)

There’s something especially beautiful and eerie (if not slightly depressing) about abandoned greenhouses. This slice of botanical history in nearby Yonkers, NY is an interesting read with some arresting images. Of course, it makes me grateful that we take such scrupulous care of our historic structures here at NYBG, and of course our own Conservatory is aging much more gracefully. ~LM

June 26, 2014

marisarenee:

Spring Snowfall
Original photographs and animated .gif set by Marisa Renee

For when your current lack of central A/C has you wondering why you ever complained about flurries in March. —MN

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