October 18, 2014
botaniverse:

Toxic, psychoactive Jimsonweed grows in Downtown NYC

"Beyond the innocuously descriptive "moonflower" (the tubular flowers open by night) and "thorn apple," various sources identify it as "devil’s apple," "devil’s snare," "devil’s weed," "devil’s trumpet" (and "angel’s trumpet"), "mad apple," and "locoweed," among many others."
See? A bit of plant knowledge makes the world a more interesting place. After all, you never know what might be growing right next to you. ~LM

botaniverse:

Toxic, psychoactive Jimsonweed grows in Downtown NYC

"Beyond the innocuously descriptive "moonflower" (the tubular flowers open by night) and "thorn apple," various sources identify it as "devil’s apple," "devil’s snare," "devil’s weed," "devil’s trumpet" (and "angel’s trumpet"), "mad apple," and "locoweed," among many others."

See? A bit of plant knowledge makes the world a more interesting place. After all, you never know what might be growing right next to you. ~LM

October 17, 2014

Master Carver Ray Villafane recently hosted a special pumpkin carving workshop here at NYBG to introduce people to his singular method of pumpkin sculpture. Ranging from the goofy to the grotesque, these certainly aren’t your grandparents’ jack-o’-lanterns. Ray himself will be at NYBG this weekend, hard at work on a massive zombie carving in full view of visitors. Just check in at our Clay Family Picnic Pavilions between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. We’ll share photos as soon as we can! ~LM

October 16, 2014

flavorpill:

Stunning Photos of the World’s Oldest Living Organisms

Plants are truly remarkable. To think these guys have been plucking along, silent spectators to the passing millenia. ~LM

October 11, 2014
mentalflossr:

15 Things You Might Not Know About Oregon

I don’t suppose a forager would have to look very closely to find that. ~LM

mentalflossr:

15 Things You Might Not Know About Oregon

I don’t suppose a forager would have to look very closely to find that. ~LM

October 10, 2014
condenasttraveler:

The view above Brooklyn Grange, a large rooftop farm in #NYC that harvests and sells its own produce. Photo by this week’s featured photographer, @shantanustarick. #brooklyn (at Brooklyn Grange Farm)

We’ve sent our own horticulture students here in the past on field trips, they do terrific work. ~LM

condenasttraveler:

The view above Brooklyn Grange, a large rooftop farm in #NYC that harvests and sells its own produce. Photo by this week’s featured photographer, @shantanustarick. #brooklyn (at Brooklyn Grange Farm)

We’ve sent our own horticulture students here in the past on field trips, they do terrific work. ~LM

October 9, 2014

archatlas:

Bosco Verticale Boeri Studio (Stefano Boeri, Gianandrea Barreca, Giovanni La Varra)

Italian architect Stefano Boeri designed this high-rise apartment buildings using trees and vegetation for its façade. ‘Bosco Verticale’ uses this design structure in two towers in Milan, Italy,  which house 900 mature trees.

Most New Yorkers dream of having a terrace garden, but what would living in a high-rise be like with full trees such as these? ~LM

(via perpetualcollapse)

October 8, 2014
unexplained-events:

Devil’s Fingers
The picture above is of a mushroom thats thought to be a specimen of Clathrus archeri right before its fingers open up. It closely resembles a hand coming out of the ground. It even has the remnants of its tattered sleeves attached to the wrist.

A little morning mycology to get you in the Halloween spirit. Keep an eye out on your next walk and see if one of these little guys makes a grab for your ankle. ~LM
(Today is also the fourth anniversary of our Tumblr’s creation. I think celebrating birthdays with ghoulish mushrooms is pretty rad. —MN)

unexplained-events:

Devil’s Fingers

The picture above is of a mushroom thats thought to be a specimen of Clathrus archeri right before its fingers open up. It closely resembles a hand coming out of the ground. It even has the remnants of its tattered sleeves attached to the wrist.

A little morning mycology to get you in the Halloween spirit. Keep an eye out on your next walk and see if one of these little guys makes a grab for your ankle. ~LM

(Today is also the fourth anniversary of our Tumblr’s creation. I think celebrating birthdays with ghoulish mushrooms is pretty rad. —MN)

October 7, 2014

ellerykr:

Orchid wall 🌸

Orchid specimens sometimes need special treatment in greenhouses—in fact, many of the epiphytic varieties get their own unique little homes. You’ll find lattices just like this in our Nolen Greenhouses for Living Collections, where some of the world’s rarest/smallest/weirdest orchid species grow happily on vertical substrates. —MN

October 7, 2014

instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”

Like those pressed flowers my grandmother used to make, but updated for the iPhone era! Autumn is the best time of year to appreciate plant structures such as these, too. As they say, beauty is in the details. ~LM

October 4, 2014
kqedscience:

We’re blown away by the incredible animated infographics by Eleanor Lutz at Tabletop Whale! 

A beautiful way to represent a wealth of information. We’ll never look at dragonflies the same way again! ~LM

kqedscience:

We’re blown away by the incredible animated infographics by Eleanor Lutz at Tabletop Whale

A beautiful way to represent a wealth of information. We’ll never look at dragonflies the same way again! ~LM

October 2, 2014
I wanted to take a moment and offer my heartfelt thanks to everyone out there who supported us in 2012, back when we were fighting to take top prize in Partners in Preservation’s grant competition. Thanks to your votes, we were able to restore the Rock Garden's famed cascade—a Depression-era creation that was in dire need of help.
It’s gurgling along happily as of now, and the project’s finally complete. You folks are the best. —MN

I wanted to take a moment and offer my heartfelt thanks to everyone out there who supported us in 2012, back when we were fighting to take top prize in Partners in Preservation’s grant competition. Thanks to your votes, we were able to restore the Rock Garden's famed cascade—a Depression-era creation that was in dire need of help.

It’s gurgling along happily as of now, and the project’s finally complete. You folks are the best. —MN

September 26, 2014

Y’know, we told the dahlias in the Home Gardening Center that perfection is unattainable, but they’re giving it their stubborn all nonetheless. —MN

September 24, 2014
itsalwaysspring:

nybg: The New York Botanical Garden

Thanks goes out to ShopSpring for featuring some of our favorite visitors to the Garden. Now if only I could coax them in through the office window in an attempt to set up some kind of Butterfly World around my desk. —MN

itsalwaysspring:

nybg: The New York Botanical Garden

Thanks goes out to ShopSpring for featuring some of our favorite visitors to the Garden. Now if only I could coax them in through the office window in an attempt to set up some kind of Butterfly World around my desk. —MN

September 23, 2014

You wouldn’t call this minimalist art, would you? It’s rich, detailed. But so….mini

Lorraine Loots’ “Postcards for Ants” is an ongoing project in which she paints or pencils coin-sized, fully-realized pieces of art—one each day until she gives herself carpal tunnel, I suppose. Among the works are some stunning micro-vegetal creations that would give our botanical artists something to “oooh” over. —MN

(Photos: This is Colossal | Lorraine Loots)

September 19, 2014
(via "Femme fatale" emerald ash borer decoy lures and kills males | Penn State University)

An international team of researchers has designed decoys that mimic female emerald ash borer beetles and successfully entice male emerald ash borers to land on them in an attempt to mate, only to be electrocuted and killed by high-voltage current.

Emerald ash borer has decimated the native ash tree population in the United States over the past few years, and has shown no sign of slowing down. To combat this threat to our forests, one team has apparently decided to go full tilt Terminator…

The researchers — including entomologists and engineers at Penn State, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the Forest Research Institute in Matrafured, Hungary, and the USDA — created the decoys using a bioreplication process with nanoscale fidelity.

If you want to find out what exactly that means, click through to read the full article. I for one welcome our new robotic beetle overlords. ~LM

(via "Femme fatale" emerald ash borer decoy lures and kills males | Penn State University)

An international team of researchers has designed decoys that mimic female emerald ash borer beetles and successfully entice male emerald ash borers to land on them in an attempt to mate, only to be electrocuted and killed by high-voltage current.

Emerald ash borer has decimated the native ash tree population in the United States over the past few years, and has shown no sign of slowing down. To combat this threat to our forests, one team has apparently decided to go full tilt Terminator

The researchers — including entomologists and engineers at Penn State, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the Forest Research Institute in Matrafured, Hungary, and the USDA — created the decoys using a bioreplication process with nanoscale fidelity.

If you want to find out what exactly that means, click through to read the full article. I for one welcome our new robotic beetle overlords. ~LM

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