August 26, 2014
I’d like to carry summer home with me in a bundle, cabbage whites or no, and enjoy it well past its sell-by date. —MN

I’d like to carry summer home with me in a bundle, cabbage whites or no, and enjoy it well past its sell-by date. —MN

(Source: maorisakai)

August 21, 2014

huntingtonlibrary:

Here’s what’s been happening with the Corpse Flower over the past six days. Getting closer to bloom time!

Follow The Huntington for bloom updates on their corpse flower (Amorphophallus titanum)! It’s big, it’s malodorous, it gives Audrey II a run for its money.

The corpse flower, I mean. Not The Huntington. The Huntington is fragrant and lovable and deserves your many visits when you’re on the left coast. —MN

August 19, 2014

run-off-the-road:

I assure you, my trip to the NYBG was very educational for me….but this happened on the way. It could not be helped. 

Most of our cacti appear frazzled by the fact that they’re so unhuggable. Poor fellas. …Except that one Chihuahuan snowball. She’s pretty chill about the whole thing. —MN

August 18, 2014
Grass-type starter every time. This isn’t up for debate. Even if you wanna be the very best (like no one ever was) from the comfort of your kitchen window sill. —MN

Grass-type starter every time. This isn’t up for debate. Even if you wanna be the very best (like no one ever was) from the comfort of your kitchen window sill. —MN

August 13, 2014
talesofscienceandlove:

Cross section of flower ovary by Ray Nelson, photomicrographer, 100x magnification, Dark Field Microscopy
Flowers are beautiful and quite inspirational as we find them presented out in nature. But there is more hidden within a flower. This image by microphotographer Ray Nelson is actually the base, or ovary, of a flower. Yes, its been enhanced using stain and special lighting, but the pattern and texture is all Mother Nature.
Source

Reminds me of millefiori glasswork! I guess a rose is a rose is a rose, no matter how you look at it. —HG

talesofscienceandlove:

Cross section of flower ovary by Ray Nelson, photomicrographer, 100x magnification, Dark Field Microscopy

Flowers are beautiful and quite inspirational as we find them presented out in nature. But there is more hidden within a flower. This image by microphotographer Ray Nelson is actually the base, or ovary, of a flower. Yes, its been enhanced using stain and special lighting, but the pattern and texture is all Mother Nature.

Source

Reminds me of millefiori glasswork! I guess a rose is a rose is a rose, no matter how you look at it. —HG

August 12, 2014

food52:

You don’t even need an oven to host this party.

More: A (Basically) No-Cook Dinner Party on Food52.

I thought we’d escaped New York’s perennial summer heat and humidity this year, but the last few days have found me savoring my air conditioned subway rides. But while the summer brings us those sticky temperatures, it also brings us fresh, ripe tomatoes and plenty of other produce that can be enjoyed raw - and that means no stove or oven heating up the whole apartment. —HG

August 11, 2014

Sometimes I look at the decades-old trees in the Garden and wonder what stories they would tell if they could. Mei Linn Chan takes this sort of sentiment literally with her gorgeous Leaf Type. With leaves like this, branches would become words and sentences and would give voice to the trees.

I love how she highlights the symmetry and asymmetry of her diverse choice of leaves by keeping only their veins to support her letters and numbers. And there are so many different shades of green! —HG

August 7, 2014

The species now called Iris ensata—commonly known as Japanese Iris—was once called Iris Kaempferi. An antique book in the collection of NYBG’s own LuEsther T. Mertz Library contains dozens of illustrations portraying different cultivars of this species in a dazzling array of colors and shapes. Not much is known about this book, but it provides a captivating glimpse into Japanese botanical history. —LM

August 1, 2014
Why go nuts with green walls and complicated climate control systems when you can just fill your garage with hanging potted plants? The owner of a taxi hub in Queens thought along the same lines when he decided to stuff his mechanic’s shop with around 1,000 plants. His reasoning? Cleaner air. Since all of his cars are hybrids already, he’s just doubling up on a good effort.
Before you ask, yes, every plant is hand-watered twice a week—which sounds like a full-time job in itself. —MN
(Photo credit: John Brecher / NBC News)

Why go nuts with green walls and complicated climate control systems when you can just fill your garage with hanging potted plants? The owner of a taxi hub in Queens thought along the same lines when he decided to stuff his mechanic’s shop with around 1,000 plants. His reasoning? Cleaner air. Since all of his cars are hybrids already, he’s just doubling up on a good effort.

Before you ask, yes, every plant is hand-watered twice a week—which sounds like a full-time job in itself. —MN

(Photo credit: John Brecher / NBC News)

July 31, 2014
You’re right, that’s just a rendering up there. But the designer of this tree, artist Sam Van Aken, is hoping to see the real things produce a similar sherbet rainbow when his “Trees of 40 Fruit” mature. Consider this the Frankenstein (or Mr. Stitch, if you saw that one) of grafting experiments.
Not a genetic experiment so much as a patient grafting of 40 different stone fruit branches onto a single trunk, this tree is designed to not only produce fruits of all sorts throughout the year, but create a stunning palette in the process. And according to Van Aken, it’s also about preserving uncommon local stone fruit varieties, some of which he stuffs into each tree he creates.
So far there are 16 young trees planted around the country. We’ll see what comes of them. Head through for the full story. —MN
(Photo credit: The Verge, Tree of 40 Fruit)

You’re right, that’s just a rendering up there. But the designer of this tree, artist Sam Van Aken, is hoping to see the real things produce a similar sherbet rainbow when his “Trees of 40 Fruit” mature. Consider this the Frankenstein (or Mr. Stitch, if you saw that one) of grafting experiments.

Not a genetic experiment so much as a patient grafting of 40 different stone fruit branches onto a single trunk, this tree is designed to not only produce fruits of all sorts throughout the year, but create a stunning palette in the process. And according to Van Aken, it’s also about preserving uncommon local stone fruit varieties, some of which he stuffs into each tree he creates.

So far there are 16 young trees planted around the country. We’ll see what comes of them. Head through for the full story. —MN

(Photo credit: The Verge, Tree of 40 Fruit)

July 29, 2014
I was just struck with the realization that I still haven’t had candy cap mushrooms (Lactarius rubidus). After reblogging a mushroom tattoo post from way back, the person highlighted in the story—Susie—got in touch with us to provide the recipe for the cookies that were mentioned. Yes, cookies made with mushrooms (that are completely innocuous and will not make you see the future).
I’ve since lost the recipe she sent me, as well as the message itself, which has caused me no end of heartbreak; Susie is awesome. But I did find a recipe here that seems pretty similar. Someday, little candy cap. Someday. —MN
(Photo Credit: Fat of the Land)

I was just struck with the realization that I still haven’t had candy cap mushrooms (Lactarius rubidus). After reblogging a mushroom tattoo post from way back, the person highlighted in the story—Susie—got in touch with us to provide the recipe for the cookies that were mentioned. Yes, cookies made with mushrooms (that are completely innocuous and will not make you see the future).

I’ve since lost the recipe she sent me, as well as the message itself, which has caused me no end of heartbreak; Susie is awesome. But I did find a recipe here that seems pretty similar. Someday, little candy cap. Someday. —MN

(Photo Credit: Fat of the Land)

July 24, 2014
Brave New Gardening for Brave New Climates

“Awareness is changing in a way that is here to stay,” said Brian Sullivan, a vice president for landscapes at The New York Botanical Garden. “Yard by yard, region by region, the overall environmental impact of this trend, which I think is very positive, is substantial.”

With drought a very real threat for much of the country, and indeed the world, that classic English lawn is looking decidedly less appetizing, no matter how easy it is on the eyes. Water bills and fertilizing issues only exacerbate the problem. That said, ripping out your entire lawn and replacing it with hardy local plants and vegetables is quickly becoming a more reasonable option than the average H.O.A. is willing to admit.
Head through for a nifty article on the growing popularity (and environmental boon) of conscientious lawns, from using hardier grass cultivars to full on xeriscaping. —MN
Photo credit: Michael Savageau/Associated Press

Brave New Gardening for Brave New Climates

“Awareness is changing in a way that is here to stay,” said Brian Sullivan, a vice president for landscapes at The New York Botanical Garden. “Yard by yard, region by region, the overall environmental impact of this trend, which I think is very positive, is substantial.”

With drought a very real threat for much of the country, and indeed the world, that classic English lawn is looking decidedly less appetizing, no matter how easy it is on the eyes. Water bills and fertilizing issues only exacerbate the problem. That said, ripping out your entire lawn and replacing it with hardy local plants and vegetables is quickly becoming a more reasonable option than the average H.O.A. is willing to admit.

Head through for a nifty article on the growing popularity (and environmental boon) of conscientious lawns, from using hardier grass cultivars to full on xeriscaping. —MN

Photo credit: Michael Savageau/Associated Press

July 22, 2014
czechthecount:

Palm Trees

I thought to myself, “I’ve got this great article on region-appropriate native landscaping that I should share on Tumblr!” But then I thought, “It’s only Tuesday. Coconut palms are the heroes the readers need.”
Tomorrow: inspiration for alternative lawns in a time of environmental uncertainty. Today: cubicle escapism. —MN

czechthecount:

Palm Trees

I thought to myself, “I’ve got this great article on region-appropriate native landscaping that I should share on Tumblr!” But then I thought, “It’s only Tuesday. Coconut palms are the heroes the readers need.”

Tomorrow: inspiration for alternative lawns in a time of environmental uncertainty. Today: cubicle escapism. —MN

July 21, 2014

fastcodesign:

On Tuesday, a bonsai tree boldly went where no bonsai tree has gone before.

Azuma Makoto, a 38-year-old artist based in Tokyo, launched two botanical arrangements into orbit: “Shiki 1,” a Japanese white pine bonsai tree suspended from a metal frame, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, lilies, hydrangeas, and irises.

Read More>

Pair this with that time Anamanaguchi sent a slice of pizza into space and the past couple of years have been good for orbital art. After being launched from the site of Burning Man in Nevada, the botanical rigs traveled to about 90,000 feet before descending back to Earth, where they were found around five miles from the launch site. —MN

Have the various space agencies ever left plants suspended in the vacuum for extended periods of time, and if so, any ideas of the physical impact on the remains?

(via fastcompany)

July 18, 2014

mentalflossr:

Four Floral Posters Featuring 200 Flowers

This weekend, make an arrangement of something. A cut flower arrangement for your dining room table; a doodle of all the backyard bugs you can see in an hour; a Things Organized Neatly-style selection of the things in your hiking pack; a garden row of soon-to-be-edible seedlings. Set aside some time to make a thing. —MN

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